Superior Development:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 1)

Superior Development
Point Count Chess: [+]


Point Count Chess, Analysis Methods
Superior Development

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 124 - Page 177 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #1

(p177) Diagram NO.124
Anderssen v. Kieseritzky, 1851
The Numerical Lead

This analysis method helps determine who has Superior Development, by comparing the number of Pieces that have been moved off their game-starting squares.

We don't included the development of Pawns, when using this analysis method.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 125A to 125B - Page 178-179 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #2

(p178-179) Diagram NO.125A to NO.125B
Keres v. Byrne, 1955
The Qualitative Lead

This analysis method takes what you learnt with the Numerical Lead, and adds more detail, about the "quality" of each army's development.

In this example, White gains the Qualitative Lead, and then takes advantage of it, using his gains to convert a developmental lead into material gain (wins a Pawn).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 126 - Page 180 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #3 (1 of 2)

(p180) Diagram NO.126
Colle System, Example Sequence
Counting Tempos (1 of 2)

The Tempo Count is only useful during the Opening phase of the game, when making multiple moves with the same unit often causes a player to fall behind in the critical development phase.

Counting Tempos is used to determine whether one side has either fallen behind in the development race, or has managed to gain a lead in development while their opponent failed to develop their army efficiently.

The Tempo Count assesses the development of both Pawns & Pieces.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 127 - Page 180 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #3 (2 of 2)

(p180) Diagram NO.127
Nimzowitsch v. Fleuss, 1906
Counting Tempos (2 of 2)

Another opportunity to see the Tempo Count being used, to identify where Tempos are gained / lost, in order to determine how well both sides have developed their army in the Opening phase of the game.

The diagram (left) shows the position after Black's 7th move (7...g7xf6), and it's White who has lost a Tempo along the way.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 128 - Page 181-182 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #4

(p181-182) Diagram NO.128
McConnell v. Morphy, 1850
The Tally of Developed Pieces

This analysis method ignores the Pawns, and focuses solely on the development of the opposing Pieces.

While not a comprehensive method, it is a quick way to identify when your Superior Development can be converted into other, more useful / better advantages.

H&M-S consider a margin of two Pieces (developed to good positions), to be a critical lead, and one which "will often produce lasting advantages", even if it doesn't immediately produce a "mating attack."
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 129 - Page 183-184 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #5 (1 of 2)

(p183-184) Diagram NO.129
Keres v. Fuderer, 1955
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece (1 of 2)

In the Opening phase (the developmental phase of the game), unnecessary moves of Pieces that you've already developed (already moved once), wastes precious development time.

This example shows both sides losing Tempos, as they move already-developed Pieces, while their opponent moves new, not-yet-developed Pieces.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Page 184 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #5 (2 of 2)

(p184) Diagram NO.130
Alekhine v. Wolf, 1922
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece (2 of 2)

No. 129 touched on the maxim: "Never move the same piece twice until you have moved each piece once.".

In this example (No. 130) we see that, sometimes, if the conditions are right, you can ignore that maxim in order to gain a Strategic Advantage.

But, you must abide by the THREE CONDITIONS that make it worthwhile.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 131 - Page 186 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #6 (1 of 2)

(p186) Diagram NO.131
Tartakower v. Capablanca, 1924
Exchanges (1 of 2)

H&M-S state that "when two pieces are exchanged, the moves they have previously made disappear from the reckoning."

In this example, we see how White makes multiple moves of the same Piece (his dark-Bishop), in order to capture Black's Queen Knight, which hadn't even moved ...

As a result, White loses the Tempos that had been gained, and Black takes the lead in Development.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 132A to 132B - Page 187 PCC, Superior Development,
Analysis Method #6 (2 of 2)

(p187) Diagram NO.132A to NO.132B
Nimzowitsch v. Capablanca, 1927
Exchanges (2 of 2)

In this second example, both sides lose Tempos when Exchanging Pieces.

The critical difference is the number of turns each side takes to make the trade; the more moves it takes, the more Tempos are wasted when the Piece is exchanged off the board.

This can lead to one side falling behind in the Tally of Developed Pieces, which would give the opponent the Superior Development.

Further Reading

Point Count Chess (Horowitz & Mott-Smith, 1960)
  • Development, (p176)
  • Superior Development, (p187)
  • Development SUMMARY, (p189)


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