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The Advanced Pawn
Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)

Point Count Chess, NO.28A, p48
Example Sequence

In No.26A & No.27A, White gained an advanced Pawn on the d-file (the Benoni Pawn at Q5).

Here, in No.28A, we get to see how Black manages to gain the Advanced Pawn on the d-file, which H&M-S say is similar to the Benoni "with colors reversed."

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.48, No.28A, after 3...d4
  2. Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3).
  3. Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3).
  4. PGN
Additional analysis includes the:

Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.48, No.28A, after 3...d4

After: 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5 3.Nf3 d4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28A - Page 48
After: 3...d4

Black's d-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28A - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3), After 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(1 of 3), After 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5
After 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5, Black forms a Chain (1...e7-e6 » 2...d7-d5), which attacks White's c4-Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28A - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3), After 3.Nf3 d4
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(1 of 3), After 3.Nf3 d4
After 3.Nf3 d4, Black gains the Advanced Pawn at his Q5 (d4).

White ignored the option to exchange Pawns on d5, choosing instead to develop his King Knight (3.Ng1-f3).

Black's response is to push his d-Pawn into its Advanced position (3...d5-d4), with the Qd8 currently keeping it safe from White's Nf3.

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The Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28A - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)), After 3...d4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(1 of 3), After 3...d4
After 3...d4, H&M-S call into question Black's attempt at gaining the early Advanced Pawn, labeling it as "dubious," against the English Opening.

The reason, they say, is to do with it allowing White to steal a lead in development -- White has already developed a Piece, while Black has chosen to move his d-Pawn for a second time, and has so far only developed Pawns.

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Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)...

  1. White plays the English Opening (1.c4)

  2. Black gains the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4) after White's 3rd move develops the King Knight (3.Ng1-f3 d4-d5). However, H&M-S call into question Black's decision, labeling it "dubious."

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Comparison of of No.26A, No.27A, and No.28A, to determine why Black's Q5 Pawn is "dubious," when White's Q5 Pawns weren't....

In No.26A (after 5.cxd5, below-left), White had already developed a Piece (Nc3), to match Black's Tally of Developed Pieces (Nf6). Only after this does White creates his Advanced Pawn, by capture (5.c4xd5).

Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.26A, No.27A and No.28A -- Diagram 26A
White's Advanced Pawn (d5),
No.26A, After 5.cxd5
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.26A, No.27A and No.28A -- Diagram 27A
White's Advanced Pawn (d5),
No.27A, After 2.d5
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.26A, No.27A and No.28A -- Diagram 28A
Black's Advanced Pawn (d4),
No.28A, After 3...d4
In No.27A (after 5.cxd5, above-right), neither side has developed any Pieces, when the opportunity arises for White to create his Advanced Pawn (2.d4-d5).

It could also be argued that White's Queen is effectively positioned, supporting the d5-Pawn, without needing to be physically moved -- developing without developing, I guess you could call it. This may be why H&M-S don't consider White's 2.d5 a "dubious" move.

In No.28A (after 3...d4, above), White had already developed his King Knight (Nf3), when Black chose to push his d-Pawn for a second time (3...d5-d4). It does give Black the Advanced Pawn at his Q5 (d4); but, it fails to develop a Piece.

White's natural lead in development (getting to move first), means, after Black's turn, each side should have developed an equal number of units. However, it's now White's turn to move, and White already has a one unit lead. Black has lost time by striving to create his early Advanced Pawn. And so, H&M-S call Black's Advanced Pawn gain "dubious."


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PGN

[Event "PCC, p48 Diagram NO.28A"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Horowitz"]
[Black "Mott-Smith"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "11"]

1. c4 e6 2. g3 d5 3. Nf3 d4 {PCC, p48 Diagram NO.28A} *

End.

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