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Holes
The Holes after P-KN3

Point Count Chess, NO.105A to NO.105B, p156-157
Matanovich v. Kieniger, 1955

This example was found amongst the section about the Compromised King-side (Chapter 13, p.155-157), and not with the other examples of Holes after P-N3 (Chapter 11, p125-127). However, I felt the opportunity for another comparison meant it useful enough to bring this one in alongside the other Hole examples.

This example begins with Black already having incurred the Kingside Holes (f6 & h6), and the fundamental process of their creation shares the same pattern as was seen in No.86 and No.87, where Black Castles Kingside (...O-O), toward the Kingside Holes, after the advance of his g-Pawn (...g7-g6) and the Fianchetto of his dark-Bishop (...Bf8-g7).

The main focus of this shorter example is to do with the subtle way in which White takes manages to take-out Black's Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, prior to taking advantage of those critical Holes in close proximity to the Black King's stronghold.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.156, No.105A, before 1.Bc5
  2. PCC, p.156, No.105B, after 5.Qh6
  3. Result of the Holes after P-KN3.
  4. Summary of the Holes after P-KN3.
  5. PGN

The Holes after P-KN3
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.156, No.105A, before 1.Bc5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105A - Page 156
Before: 1.Bc5

1. How Black has already incurred critical Holes, on the Kingside, at f6 & h6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, Before 1.Bc5
Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
Before 1.Bc5
Before 1.Bc5, Black has already incurred two critical Holes (f6 & h6), in close proximity to the Black King's stronghold; White has units targeting both weak squares.

Black's King has been Castled into his Kingside stronghold. following the advance of the g-pawn (...g7-g6) and the Fianchetto of his dark-Bishop (...Bf8-g7), which now takes over guard duty of the two Holes, from Black's g-Pawn, which can no longer perform that function.

Note also the absence of Black's e-Pawn, which has been removed from the board, which not only causes the f6-square to become a Hole, but also contributes to Black incurring a Weak-Square Complex of dark-squares, on the Kingside (exactly what happened in No.87).

Regarding White's position, he's got units applying pressure to both f6- & h6-Holes:

White's King Rook also sits on the e-file, again like it did in No.87.

The notable difference, for White, is the Kingside position of White's King (Kg1), following Castling, compared to the Queenside position White's King took in No.87:
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.87 vs. No. 105, The Holes after P-KN3, White Castles Queenside -- Diagram 87
(COMPARISON), No.87
White Castles Queenside,
After 11...O-O*
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.87 vs. No. 105, The Holes after P-KN3, White Castles Kingside -- Diagram 105
(COMPARISON), No.105
White Castles Kingside,
Before 1.Bc5

* White's Queenside Castling, in No.87, takes place after 10.O-O-O. However, for the sake of the comparison, it was better to show it after both Black Kings had Castled Kingside, into their strongholds in the vicinity of the two critical Holes (f6 & h6)


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The Result of the Holes after P-KN3...

2. How White manages to take-out Black's Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, prior to taking advantage of those critical Holes (f6 & h6)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 1.Bc5 b6 2.Ba3
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 1.Bc5 b6 2.Ba3
After 1.Bc5 b6 2.Ba3, White reveals he wasn't interested in the Queen-Bishop Battery to the h6-Hole, as he sends his dark-Bishop off to Pin Black's Nd6, on the a3-f8 diagonal (1.Be3-c5).

Black's Queen (Qe7) is the Piece that's being shielded, and in part making the conditions right for the Pin to happen.

In addition to that first Pin, the move by White's Bishop also unleashes a Discovered Attack, from White's Re1, which applies a Pin of its own, against Black's Be6 (once again, Black's Queen is involved, as the more-valuable Piece needing to be protected, at the expense of Black's light-Bishop).

Even the advance attack by Black's b-Pawn (1...b7-b6) doesn't manage to interrupt the Pin by White's dark-Bishop, which simply retreats toward base camp (2.Bc5-a3) all the while maintaining the diagonal Pin against Black's Nd7. Incidentally, Black has incurred a Weak-Square Complex of light-squares (a cluster of same-colored Holes), on the Queenside, from that same b-Pawn advance.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 2...Bxc3 3.bxc3
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 2...Bxc3 3.bxc3
After 2...Bxc3 3.bxc3, White succeeds in his objective to take-out Black's Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, by forcing Black to exchange it, for White's Nc3.

Because of White's Rook Pin, against Black's light-Bishop (Be6), White would be able to attack Black's Queen, with his Nc3 going to d5.

Black is forced to exchange his his Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, for White's Knight (2...Bg7xc3), to remove the threat to his Queen. But it comes at the expense of removing the key guard of the two critical Holes (f6 & h6).
Even though White incurs Doubled c-Pawns, when his b-Pawn completes the trade (3.b2xc3), it's not the weak structure that Doubled Pawns sometimes are...

This is because White's leading Doubled Pawn (c3) keeps Black's Nc6 out of both b4 & d4, and it also prevents Black's b-Pawn from advancing into White's territory (after ...b6-b5-b4, White would get to un-Double his Pawns, with c3xb4, and would have a Queenside Pawn Majority, to take on, what would be, Black's two Isolated Pawns, at a7 & c7, respectively).

3. How White takes advantage of Black's h6-Hole

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 3...Qd7 to 5.Qh6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 3...Qd7 to 5.Qh6
After 3...Qd7 to 5.Qh6, White posts his Queen onto the h6-Hole, attacking Black's Rf8 along the h6-f8 diagonal, attacking Black's Backward h7-Pawn, and ensuring Black's King is kept prisoner on the Kingside.

In the build-up to that, Black breaks the two Pin leading toward his Queen's former position at e7, by switching his Queen to the Open d-file (3...Qe7-d7), behind the Nd6.

White then activates his Queen Rook, by bringing it also to the d-file (4.Ra1-d1), threatening a second Discovered Attack, and the reapplication of a Pin against Black's Nd7, with the relocation of White's Bd3 (capturing on g6, which is what happened in the game, as we'll see shortly).

I assume the move by Black's Queen Knight (4...Nc6-a5) is to prevent White Doubled Pawns from mobilizing, by stopping the advance of White's c3-Pawn.

And then, as mentioned, White's Queen is posted to the h6-Hole (5.Qf4-h6). The combination of White's Qh6 and Bd3 threatens to decimate the Pawns around the Black King's stronghold, at g6.


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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.156, No.105B, after 5.Qh6

After: 1.Bc5 b6 2.Ba3 Bxc3 3.bxc3 Qd7 4.Rad1 Na5 5.Qh6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105B - Page 156
After: 5.Qh6
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 5...f6 6.Bxg6 hxg6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 5...f6 6.Bxg6 hxg6
After 5...f6 6.Bxg6 hxg6, White sacrifices his light-Bishop, to help decimate the the Pawns around the Black King's stronghold, and unleash another Discovered Attack, which Pins Black's Nd6, to its Queen (Qd7), stopping the Knight from helping to defend the Kingside against White's invasion.

First, Black advances his f-Pawn (5...f7-f6).

And then White's light-Bishop takes-out Black's g6-Pawn (6.Bd3xg6), which Dis-covers the attack from White's Rd1, that Pins Black's Nd6 to its Qd7, and forces Black's h-Pawn to complete the trade (6...h7xg6), putting it at the mercy of White's Queen (Qh6).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 7.Qxg6+ Kh8
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 7.Qxg6+ Kh8
After 7.Qxg6+ Kh8, the two critical Holes (f6 & h6) are pretty much irrelevant now, as White's Queen takes-out Black's former h-Pawn, on the g-file (7.Qh6xg6+), which forces Black's King to flee onto the h-file (7...Kg8-h8), but it comes at the cost of his King becoming trapped on his h8-corner square, by White's Qg6.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 8.Bxd6 to 9...Qxe6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 8.Bxd6 to 9...Qxe6
After 8.Bxd6 to 9...Qxe6, White begins to further Simplify the board, to remove the Black Pieces that could otherwise halt or prevent White's charge to victory.

First, White sacrifices his dark-Bishop, to exchange Black's Nd6 off the board (8.Ba3xd6). Because of the position of White's Rd1, which had been Pinning Black's Nd6, Black is forced to complete the trade with his c-Pawn (8...c7xd6), but at the cost of it becoming another Isolated Pawn in Black's steadily unraveling army.

Next, White sacrifices his Re1, to exchange Black's Be6 off the board (9.Re1xd6), with Black's Queen the only available unit to complete the trade (9...Qd7xe6). The real consequence of this is it causes Black's Isolated f6-Pawn to become paralyzed, as it's now Pinned by White's Queen (Qg6).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 10.Rd4
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 10.Rd4
After 10.Rd4, Black resigns, as White's remaining Rook comes forward (10.Rd1-d4), as Checkmate is now inevitable (H&M-S's example, below, shows why Black opted to resign) ...

4. H&M-S's possible continuation, if Black hadn't resigned at 10.Rd4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 10...Qc4 11.Qh5+ Kg7
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 10...Qc4 11.Qh5+ Kg7
After 10...Qc4 11.Qh5+ Kg7, Black would be forced to sacrifice his Queen, in order to prolong his game.

Black's Queen (10...Qe6-c4) would be placed in the firing line of White's Rd4, in order to force White to move his Queen to check Black's King (11.Qg6-h5+), which would halt Black's threat to capture White's Rd4, but allow Black's King to escape from the confines of his corner square (11...Kh8-g7).

However, Black's actions are only prolonging the inevitable, and his troops would soon be further cut down ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 12.Rxc4 to 13...Kh8
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 12.Rxc4 to 13...Kh8
After 12.Rxc4 to 13...Kh8, White would get to further Simplify the position, by sacrificing his remaining Rook, in an exchange, to take-out Black's Queen (12.Rd4xc4).

As Black's Knight completes that trade (12...Na5xc4), it leaves the Knight on c4 without any defenders, and White's Queen would force Black to get his King out of check (13.Qh4-g4+ Kg7-h8), in order to prevent Black from getting his Nc4 to safety.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 105 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-KN3, After 14.Qxc4
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-KN3,
After 14.Qxc4
After 14.Qxc4, H&M-S's example, of a possible continuation from the Matanovic-Kieniger game, ends here.

The inevitable capture of Black's Knight, by White's Queen (14.Qg4xc4), further Simplifies the board, depriving Black of more units that might otherwise be able to properly defend their exposed King, on his severely Compromised King-side.

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Summary of the Holes after P-KN3...

  1. At the point where this example begins, Black has already incurred two critical Holes (f6 & h6), in close proximity to the Black King's stronghold; White has two units targeting both weak squares (Be3 & Qf4, although the Bishop is actually intended for another role, as explained in Summary entry #2, below). The overall position is very similar to the one seen in No.87, but for the notable difference of White's King, which here has Castled Kingside, but in No.87 it Castles Queenside. However, in both examples, White goes on to win the game, so the choice of Castling, for White, seems to be less significant than it does for Black. What is significant, for White's victory, appears to be the ability to take-out Black's Fianchettoed dark-Bishop (Bg7).


  2. White manages to take-out Black's Fianchettoed dark-Bishop (Bg7), prior to taking advantage of those critical Holes (f6 & h6). White's applies multiple Relative Pins, against Black units on the two Center Files (d & e), to force, or at least coax Black into voluntarily exchanging his Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, for White's Nc3:

    1. It begins with a Pin by White's light-Bishop (Be3), when White reveals he wasn't interested in the Queen-Bishop Battery to the h6-Hole, instead sending his dark-Bishop off to Pin Black's Nd6, on the a3-f8 diagonal (1.Be3-c5).

    2. In addition to that first Pin, the move by White's Bishop also unleashes a Discovered Attack, from White's Re1, which applies a Pin of its own, against Black's Be6 -- once again, Black's Queen is involved, as the more-valuable Piece needing to be protected, at the expense of Black's light-Bishop). Because of White's Rook Pin, against Black's light-Bishop (Be6), White would be able to attack Black's Queen, with his Nc3 going to d5.

    3. And so, Black is forced to exchange his his Fianchettoed dark-Bishop, for White's Knight (2...Bg7xc3), to remove the threat to his Queen. But it comes at the expense of removing the key guard of the two critical Holes (f6 & h6).


  3. White takes advantage of Black's h6-Hole:

    1. First by posting his Queen onto the h6-Hole, attacking Black's Rf8 along the h6-f8 diagonal, attacking Black's Backward h7-Pawn, and ensuring Black's King is kept prisoner on the Kingside.

    2. Next, White sacrifices his light-Bishop, to help decimate the the Pawns around the Black King's stronghold, and unleash another Discovered Attack, which Pins Black's Nd6, to its Queen (Qd7), stopping the Knight from helping to defend the Kingside against White's invasion.

    3. The two critical Holes (f6 & h6) are pretty much irrelevant, at the point when White's Queen takes-out Black's former h-Pawn, on the g-file (7.Qh6xg6+), which forces Black's King to flee onto the h-file (7...Kg8-h8), but it comes at the cost of his King becoming trapped on his h8-corner square, by White's Qg6.

    4. White begins to further Simplify the board, to remove the Black Pieces that could otherwise halt or prevent White's charge to victory. Black resigns, as White's remaining Rook comes forward (10.Rd1-d4).


  4. H&M-S's possible continuation, if Black hadn't resigned at 10.Rd4, would begin with Black being forced to sacrifice his Queen, in order to prolong his game. Black's Queen would be placed in the firing line of White's Rd4, in order to force White to move his Queen to check Black's King, which would halt Black's threat to capture White's Rd4, but allow Black's King to escape from the confines of his corner square. White would get to further Simplify the position, by sacrificing his remaining Rook, in an exchange, to take-out Black's Queen, followed by the removal of Black's last remaining Knight, depriving Black of more units that might otherwise be able to properly defend their exposed King, on his severely Compromised King-side.


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PGN

[Event "PCC, p156 Diagram NO. 105A and NO. 105B"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1955.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Matanovich"]
[Black "Kieniger"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r4rk1/ppp1qpbp/2nnb1p1/8/5Q2/2NBBN2/PPP2PPP/R3R1K1 w - - 0 0"]
[PlyCount "27"]

{PCC, p156 Diagram NO.105A} 1. Bc5 b6 2. Ba3 Bxc3 3. bxc3 Qd7 4. Rad1 Na5 5. Qh6 {PCC, p156 Diagram NO.105B} f6 6. Bxg6 hxg6 7. Qxg6+ Kh8 8. Bxd6 cxd6 9. Rxe6 Qxe6 10. Rd4 {... Matanovic vs. Kieniger game ends here ... H&M-S add the following possible continuation of the sequence ...} Qc4 11. Qh5+ Kg7 12. Rxc4 Nxc4 13. Qg4+ Kh8 14. Qxc4 *

End.

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