GW-KW, Point Count Chess Raw Discussion, File #6:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 2)

Game 1 with KW's Notes added to GW's Opening 6 Moves, Attempting to Understand Control of the Center
[June 3rd 2011]


6. ???
(GW, June 2nd) Here's an example of where decisions, for my next move, really start to clash.

  • [6. Nc3] With Black's 2 Knights on their optimum first-move squares, 6. Nc3 would be one option. But, that's tempered by the potential for Black's d-pawn to attack it, with 6. ... d4. I'd then be forced to move the Knight TWICE in the opening, for a loss of tempo or potential loss of tempo?

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) The other problem with this move is that it locks in White's c2 pawn. As far as the tempo issue, Black has to move twice as well (his initial d7-d5, and now d5-d4), so tempo would still be equal, even if White has to move. Besides, this move would create a backward pawn on the c5 square.

(GW, June 2nd)

  • [6. Bg5] I've seen Yasser Seirawan send his Queen Bishop out to attack Black's King Knight, only to be instantly repelled by Black King Rook Pawn to h6. If/when attacked, I could drop my Bishop down to h4, to keep pin attack on the Knight & Queen. While it's threatening Black's King Knight, which has an impact on Black's Center control, from h4 my Bishop wouldn't be having any direct impact on the Center.

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) Ask yourself what Seirawan sees in this move as regards center control. By pinning the f6 Knight, White has effectively reduced the number of defenders on d5, and hinders Ne4. This move (and any subsequent Bh4) makes a large impact on the center.

(GW, June 2nd)

  • [6. c4] I don't particularly like the Black Phalanx (c5,d5) and have toyed with the idea of trying to dismantle it with immediate effect.

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) I have commented above that this also is a good plan.

(GW, June 2nd)

  • [6. Nd2 v. 6. Re1] If, instead, I wanted to push the e-Pawn into action, I'm struggling to decide whether to bring the Queen Knight across first, to d2, which attacks e4. Or, sidestep the Rook to e1. At the risk of answering my own question, I recall advice saying to move Knights before Bishops, Bishops before Rooks. So, should it be 6. Nd2, first? The Knight would block the Queen Bishop, but that could be fianchettoed, to attack the Center from b2.

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) (Referring to GW: "At the risk of answering my own question, I recall advice saying to move Knights before Bishops, Bishops before Rooks. So, should it be 6. Nd2, first?") Right. Good general rule of thumb.

(KW, June 3rd) Another idea is to move the Bishop first with Bg5 (also reducing one of the attackers of e4), then move Nd2 on a later move, then e4. Rome doesn't have to be built in a day.

... As always, it doesn't seem to matter which move I decide upon, as soon as the opponent moves, my original plans/ideas seem to crumble (not that they were much in the first place. But, that'll come with training and practice).

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) This is what makes chess so interesting, the continual give and take of opposing ideas and tactics. You should expect this ebb and flow. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. For many, they pick an opening (like the Barcza System), and learn the first 8-10 moves for each side, so they don't have to reinvent the wheel. Very few people under Master level go beyond the first 8-10 moves, unless they just learn the main line past that point.

Furthermore, should I have bothered to complete the Barcza Opening (1. Nf3, 2. g3, 3. Bg2, 4. 0-0) when Black's d-pawn advanced to d5? E.g. should I have played 3. d4, to prevent Black's c-pawn advance, creating the 5th Rank Phalanx; or, would that have been unnecessarily chickening-out of following through with the planned Barcza Opening?

Ken's Comments ...

(KW, June 3rd) Here I'd go with unnecessarily chickening-out. If you would have moved d5, Black probably would have played c5 anyway, as if you take dxc5, the Bishop on f8 would retake. Part of the opening process is to create imbalance. If every position were equal, every game would be a draw, and what fun would there be with that?

The Barcza moves have never been refuted for either White or Black. Trust it as one way to start a game.


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