Strong Outpost Station:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 1) and the
Chess Strategies Guide (Section 3: Studying the Pieces)

Strong Outpost Station
Point Count Chess: [+]


Point Count Chess, Examples
Strong Outpost Station

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 95A to 95C - p138-140 Example #1
Station in Front of Isolani

(p138-140) Diagram NO. 95A to NO. 95C.
Tarrasch v. Teichmann, 1910
Station in Front of Isolani

The diagram (left), shows the first of three positions featured by H&M-S in their explanation of getting a Knight onto an Outpost Station, in front of an Isolated Pawn ("Isolani").

Any Piece on the Outpost in front of an Isolani is "immune from Pawn attack", as there are no enemy Pawns on adjacent files to chase the Piece (i.e. the Knight) away.

In this example, White gets the Strong Outpost Station (at d5), while Black is hampered with the Isolani.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 96 - Page 141-142 Example #2
The Fourth-Rank Outpost

(p141-142) Diagram NO. 96.
Tarrasch v. Teichmann, 1912
The Fourth-Rank Outpost

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they explain the importance of the d4-Outpost Station, for White's army.

In this example, you get to see how this d4-Outpost Station is created, and how White's King plays a key role to maintain it, all the way through to White's victory.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Page 143 Example #3
The Station at K5 (1 of 2)

(p143) Diagram NO. 97.
Milner Barry v. Znosko Borovsky, 1928
The Station at K5 (1 of 2)

K5 is the Descriptive notation reference for the e5-square, going in White's direction up the board.

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they explain the importance of the e5-Outpost Station, for White's army.

In this example, you get to see how this e5-Outpost Station is created, and how it combines with weakening Black's Pawn Guards in front of their King, on the Kingside, in the build-up to an attack on Black's King.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 98 - Page 144-145 Example #4
The Station at K5 (2 of 2)

(p144-145) Diagram NO. 98.
Pillsbury v. Tarrasch, 1895
The Station at K5 (2 of 2)

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they provide an alternative example of the e5-Outpost Station, for White's army.

In this example, you get to see how this e5-Outpost Station is created, including the contributing Pawns and Pieces that help to maintain it, through to the very end of the game.

In the Example #1 (above), White begins the game with 1.e4; in this example the Outpost in this example is gained from a 1.d4 opening.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 99 - Page 145-146 Example #5
The Station at Q5

(p145-146) Diagram NO. 99.
Ivkov v. Letelier, 1955
The Station at Q5

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they explain the use of the d5-Outpost Station, for White's army.

The d5-Outpost, in this example, is only a temporary feature that enables White to weaken the Pawn Guard surrounding Black's Kingside Castled King, by sacrificing the Knight that so briefly occupies the Outpost.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Page 146-147 Example #6
Stations on the Sixth Rank

(p146-147) Diagram NO. 100.
Furman v. Smyslov, 1949
Stations on the Sixth Rank

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they explain the merit of striving to both gain a 6th Rank Outpost, and to occupy it with a Piece.

In this example, White gains the 6th Rank Outpost (e6), sacrificing material first to gain the Outpost, and then to maintain the light-Bishop (not the usual Knight!) on the e6-Outpost.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 101 - Page 147-148 Example #7
Plugging the Outpost Station

(p147-148) Diagram NO. 101.
Jacobs v. Evans, 1955
Plugging the Outpost Station

The diagram (left), shows the one and only position featured by H&M-S, as they showcase one option for neutralizing your opponent's Outpost Station.

In this example, White has the d5-Outpost; Black plays to force White to fill his d5-Outpost, with the e4-Pawn.

The result, for Black, isn't just a filled-in Outpost; it also serves to defend Black's Backward d6-Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A to 102B - Page 148-149 Example #8
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2)

(p148-149) Diagram NO. 102A to NO. 102B.
Denker v. Kashdan, 1932
The Battle of Outposts
(1 of 2)


The diagram (left), shows the first of two positions featured by H&M-S, as they dissect a game to show both sides battling to benefit from their Outpost Stations.

In this example (the first of two), White gains three Outposts, while Black gains just the one Station. In the end, it's White's Outpost at c6 that helps White win this Battle of Outposts.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 103A to 103B - Page 150-151 Example #9
The Battle of Outposts (2 of 2)

(p150-151) Diagram NO. 103A to NO. 103B.
Tarrasch v. Noa, 1885
The Battle of Outposts
(2 of 2)


The diagram (left), shows the second of two positions featured by H&M-S, as they dissect a game to show both sides battling to benefit from their Outpost Stations.

In this example (the second of two), both sides gain two significant Outposts (c5 & d6, for White; c4 & d5, for Black), but in the end it's White who wins this Battle of Outposts, which contributes to his victory.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - Page 56 Example #10
When a Pawn occupying the
Station is more menacing

(p56) Diagram NO. 34.
Euwe v. Bogoljubov, 1928
When a Pawn occupying the Station is more menacing

This example was found in Chapter 4, The Advanced Pawn (PCC, p56-57), which H&M-S mentioned during Chapter 12, The Outpost Station (PCC, p144).

White gains the e5-Outpost and occupies it with a Knight; Black faces the dilemma about whether to capture it, only for White's d4-Pawn to replace it.

Black must ask whether the Pawn at e5 will put him in a worse situation.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 35 - Page 57 Example #11
Premature occupation
of an Outpost Station

(p57) Diagram NO. 35.
Tarrasch v. Von Scheve, 1894
Premature occupation of an Outpost Station

This example was found in Chapter 4, The Advanced Pawn (PCC, p57-58), which H&M-S mentioned during Chapter 12, The Outpost Station (PCC, p144).

Black gains the e4-Outpost and occupies it with a Knight, but it turns out to be too soon to post his Knight there, and White reaps the benefits.

Also includes a Comparison between Examples 10 & 11.

Further Reading

Point Count Chess (Horowitz & Mott-Smith, 1960)
  • The Outpost Station, (p137)
  • The Outpost Station SUMMARY, (p152)


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