The Passed Pawn:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 1) and the
Chess Strategies Guide (Section 2: Studying the Pawns)

The Passed Pawn
Point Count Chess: [+]


Point Count Chess, Examples
The Passed Pawn

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 173 - Page 247-248 PCC, The Passed Pawn. Example #1
Actual and Potential Passed Pawns

(p247-248) Diagram NO.173
Example Sequence
Actual and Potential Passed Pawns

In this example, White's b3-Pawn is the Actual Passed Pawn.

Black's 3-Pawn Majority, represents the Potential Passed Pawn (Black can potentially impose his Majority to force through an Actual Passed Pawn, by using his extra Pawn to carve through White's 2-Pawn Minority.

But, it's White's turn to move, and this is crucial in enabling White to take advantage and triumph, despite Black's supposed structural superiority.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 174A to 174B - Page 248 PCC, The Passed Pawn. Example #2
The Midgame Passed Pawn

(p248) Diagram NO.174A to NO.174B.
Unzicker v. Donner, 1955
The Midgame
Passed Pawn


In the Endgame phase, a Passed Pawn can often be a decisive advantage for victory. The side who gains a Passed Pawn early on in the game, should seek to trade immediately into the Endgame phase. The opponent should try and avoid these exchanges.

In this example, White's d-Pawn becomes the Midgame Passed Pawn, and we see how White goes about trading his way into the Endgame phase, to make the most of his potential game-winning advantage.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram xa to xc - Page 253 PCC, The Passed Pawn. Example #3
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2)

(p253) Diagram NO.178
Example Sequence
The Crippled Majority
(1 of 2)


A "Crippled Majority" refers to an imbalance of Pawns on one side of the board. The side with the majority of Pawns has a critical weakness in its structure (H&M-S say it's usually either Doubled Pawns, or a Backward Pawn, which makes the Pawn Majority "crippled"), The Crippled Majority is unable to force through a Passed Pawn.

Includes additional analysis, looking at why a Crippled Majority (of Pawns) cannot force through a Passed Pawn, against the opposition's Pawn Minority.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 179 - Page 253-254 PCC, The Passed Pawn. Example #3
The Crippled Majority (2 of 2)

(p253-254) Diagram NO.179
Ed. Lasker v. Capablanca, 1915
The Crippled Majority
(2 of 2)


In this example, we see how White gains the Crippled Majority, and how Black takes advantage of it, to win the game.

This could be a key part of an overall game-winning strategy: crippling your opponent's Pawn structure, on one side of the board, trading material into the Endgame phase, and then using your King to remove your opponent's Crippled Majority, in order to convert your Pawnn (on the same wing), into Passed Pawn, which your King escorts to Promotion.

Further Reading

Point Count Chess (Horowitz & Mott-Smith, 1960)
  • The Passed Pawn, (p246)
  • The Passed Pawn SUMMARY, (p254)


Return to the Index of Advantages
Return to the Chess Strategies Guide,
Studying the Pawns (Passed Pawns)
← Back to the Chess Glossary (Passed Pawn)
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