GW-KW, Point Count Chess Raw Discussion, File #8:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 2)

Game 3, KW's Major Digression,
7 Patterns You MUST KNOW for
Control of a Square

[Introduction]


Note:
The following lesson, from Ken, came about after Move 16. Nb3 Rfe8:

(GW, June 25th): (Proposed Move: 17. f4)
Reasoning:

With Black's KR going to e8, I have to assume Black potentially calculates some action along the e-file. I think Black is gearing up for e6-e5, to attack our d4-pawn, which is already 2x attacked, 3x defended.

Black already has Control of e5, with 2 units directly guarding it, versus only one White unit (our d4-pawn). Playing e6-e5 would add a third unit (Re8), making it 3 v 1, in Black's favor, on e5.

(KW, June 25th) OK, we need to stop here and make a
MAJOR DIGRESSION.

Black does NOT control e5, WHITE shares control of e5. I think it is time we do a MAJOR clarification of COA Control, COA Center Domination, and Control of a Square, which leads to Control of the Center.

This is a major stumbling block for beginners, and is often one of the causes of their defeat by stronger players. Control is recognized by a stronger player based on a set of concepts, or better yet, patterns. Pattern Recognition is one of the major ways we as humans learn (I believe I mentioned this earlier in our game), and it is ESSENTIAL in chess.

This is more important than learning the first 10 moves of an opening as well as Anand (although that too is a form of pattern recognition, but certain patterns have a certain priority in what needs to be learned first, over openings).

Capablanca never memorized openings, but he knew the patterns that would win games. Tactics are made up of patterns (pins, forks, discovered attacks, removal of a guard, etc), strategy is made up of patterns (2 Bishops, Good Bishop v. Bad Bishop, Backward Pawn, Outposts, Weak Square Complex, etc.), Control of Squares are made up of patterns (COA Control, Vulnerability, etc.), and Control of the Center is made up of patterns (Pawn on 4 v. 3, 2 v. 1 in Center, etc).

What I have learned from the dozens of chess books I have read and absorbed, and from my games, I have never seen in print all in one place. I will attempt to do so from memory now, and draw from as many sources as I can remember. I will also try to use analogies and diagrams to make the Patterns understandable.

A caveat in what follows: I may not know all patterns to determine Control of a Square, or I may forget to include a pattern which is important. But the following should be of assistance.



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