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Advanced Salient
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4)

(Not featured in Point Count Chess)
Evans v. Rossolimo, 1955

Like No.24, this is another example where White gains the Advanced Salient at his Q5 (d5), which Black manages to destroy, en route to winning the game.

In other words, Black's opposing Reverse Salient triumphs over White's Advanced Salient formation.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of a game that features a battle between Salient v. Reverse Salient:
  1. Advanced Salient v. Reverse Salient, after 15.c4
  2. Result of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4).
  3. Summary of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4).
  4. PGN

Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
After 15.c4

After: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 O-O 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2 c5 11.d4 Qc7 12.Nbd2 Nc6 13.d5 Nd8 14.a4 Rb8 15.c4

Point Count Chess - IE - Advanced Salients (Not Featured in Point Count Chess) - Example 3
After: 15.c4

1. White cannot build a 3 Pawn Phalanx, to gain the
Advanced Salient

I mention this only because the previous examples (No.24 and Ex.2) both saw White form a 3-Pawn Phalanx, prior to gaining his Advanced Salient. However, in this example, Black's e5- & c5- Pawns both guard the d4-square, meaning White must find an alternative means for gaining his Advanced Salient at his Q5 (d5). This is how it happens ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 1.e4 e5
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 1.e4 e5
After 1.e4 e5, this Classical King Pawn Opening sees both opposing e-Pawns fix themselves into positions to form part of their respective Salient formations.

White's e4-Pawn (1.e2-e4) will form part of the 'Base' of his Advanced Salient (c4,d5,e4).

Black's e5-Pawn (1...e7-e5) will form part of the 'Van' of his Reverse Salient (c5,d6,e5), that will oppose White's Advanced Salient.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 2.Nf3 to 5...Be7
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 2.Nf3 to 5...Be7
After 2.Nf3 to 5...Be7, both sides continue their development to enable their Kings to Castle Kingside.

White has already Castled (2.Ng1-f3 » 3.Bf1-b5 » 5.O-O), during which he has attempted to paralyze Black's Nc6, by Pinning it with his light-Bishop (3.Bf1-b5), as the Nc6 is helping to guard the d4-square, which is crucial for White's d-Pawn to pass through, en route to the head of the Advanced Salient, at d5.

Even when Black repels the first attack (3...a7-a6), White still tries to maintain the Pin with his Bishop (4.Bb5-a4).

Black clears his back rank (2...Nb8-c6 » 5...Bf8-e7) and is ready to Castle, with his Knight attacking, what will be, part of the 'Base' of White's Advanced Salient (White's e4-Pawn, currently undefended).

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3
After 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3, White defends his e4-Pawn, with his King Rook (6.Rf1-e1). Black's b-Pawn (6...b7-b5) achieves a couple of things:
  1. First, it breaks the Pin on its Nc6, by driving away White's light-Bishop (7.Ba4-b3);

  2. Second, it now guards the c4-square, which is another Pawn that prevents White from developing a 3-Pawn Phalanx, prior to gaining the Advanced Salient, causing White to adapt his development, accordingly.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 8.c3 O-O
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 7...d6 8.c3 O-O
After 7...d6 8.c3 O-O, Black slots his d-Pawn into position (7...d7-d6), where it'll form the Base of his Reverse Salient.

White's c-Pawn spends the first of two turns to into position at c4, where it will form the other part of the Base of his Advanced Salient.

With this first move (8.c2-c3), White's c-Pawn provides support for an intended d2-d4 push ...

The move also provides White's light-Bishop with an escape route (Bb3-c2), while the single step forward ensures White's c-Pawn isn't captured (...b5xc4) before it can play its part in the Advanced Salient formation.

Black takes the opportunity to Castle Kingside (8...O-O).

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2
After 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2, White develops his h-Pawn (9.h2-h3), to prevent Black's light-Bishop from Pinning White's Nf3 (e.g. ...Bc8-g4), which would paralyze White's Knight, removing its current pressure against Black's e5-Pawn, which will be part of the 'Van' of Black's opposing Reverse Salient.

Black's Queen Knight then forces the retreat of White's light Bishop (9...Nc6-a5 10.Bb3-c2).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 10...c5 11.d4
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 10...c5 11.d4
After 10...c5 11.d4, Black gains his Reverse Salient, with the development of his c-Pawn (10...c7-c5).

White decides the time is right to push up his d-Pawn (11.d2-d4), which is now one step away from its intended position at what will be the 'Van' of White's Advanced Salient.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 11...Qc7 12.Nbd2 Nc6
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 11...Qc7 12.Nbd2 Nc6
After 11...Qc7 12.Nbd2 Nc6, Black develops his Queen (11...Qd8-c7), in preparation to Connect his Rooks, so they can work together on the Kingside.

White's Queen Knight (12.Nb1-d2) comes across to provide support, ready for the second advance of his c-Pawn (c3-c4).

Black returns his Queen Knight to c6 (12...Na5-c6).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 13.d5 Nd8
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 13.d5 Nd8
After 13.d5 Nd8, White's d-Pawn (12.d4-d5) is pushed a second time, into the Advanced position, where it currently forms the 'Van' of an Advanced Chain (e4,d5), and will soon form the 'Van' of White's Advanced Salient.

Black's Nc6 is forced backwards (13...Nc6-d8), during the advance of White's d-Pawn.

2. Play that leads to White's Advanced Salient

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 14.a4 Rb8
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 14.a4 Rb8
After 14.a4 Rb8, White develops his a-Pawn (14.a2-a4), attacking Black's b5-Pawn, which Black reinforces with his Queen Rook (14...Ra8-b8).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 15.c4
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 15.c4
After 15.c4, White gains his Advanced Salient, with the second push of his c-Pawn (15.c3-c4).

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The Result of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 15.c4 b4
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 15.c4 b4
After 15.c4 b4, even though White gains his Advanced Salient, with the second advance of his c-Pawn (15.c3-c4), it doesn't stop Black's march into White's territory, as he forms an Advanced Chain, with another push of his b-Pawn (15...b5-b4), which now restricts White's Queenside.

White must try for play on the Kingside ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 16.Kh2 to 25.Rh1
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 16.Kh2 to 25.Rh1
After 16.Kh2 to 25.Rh1, apart from one move (21.b2-b3), all the play has focused on trying to make a break through on the Kingside.

See how all Pieces point both towards and along the Kingside flank.
This is actually the last position, before a breakthrough is made, and it's White who comes off worse, and it all starts with an exchange of Pawns ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 25...f5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 25...f5
After 25...f5, Black's f-Pawn (25...f6-f5) attacks the Kingside Base of White's Advanced Salient (striking at the e4-Pawn).

White's g4-Pawn only serves to increase the tension around that area, which leads to the inevitable ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 26.gxf5 gxf5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 26.gxf5 gxf5
After 26.gxf5 gxf5, an exchange of Pawns, led by White's g-Pawn (26.g4xf5) and completed by Black's g-Pawn (26...g6xf5), maintains Black's f-Pawn attack against the e4-Base of White's Advanced Salient.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 27.exf5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 27.exf5
After 27.exf5, White is forced to demolish his Advanced Salient, removing his e-Pawn (27.e4xf5) from the structure, to complete the Pawn exchange.

Had White not done so, Black's replacement f-Pawn will march forward, forming a second Advanced Chain, but in a more dangerous position, so close to White's King.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 3 (Result) - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4), After 66...Qh4+
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4),
After 66...Qh4+
After 66...Qh4+, Black's Reverse Salient is still in place, when White resigns. None of White's Pawns can force their way beyond Black's cluster of Pawns (to create a Passed Pawn).

Meanwhile, White is about to lose his Queen, to a Black Queen Skewer (66...Qf4-h4+). Both Queens will be exchanged off the board, with White's King completing the trade. But, Black has the Passed Pawn (h6), which can be escorted by its King, down to gain Promotion.

White's position is futile, hence the resignation. Clearly, Black's Reverse Salient has triumphed over White's Advanced Salient.


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Summary of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (3 of 4)...

  1. White has to take a few extra moves to gain his Advanced Salient. This is in comparison with previous examples (No.24 and Ex.2), where White was able to form a 3-Pawn Phalanx, prior to gaining the Advanced Salient.

  2. Black's f-Pawn causes the destruction of White's Advanced Salient. This was another similarity with No.24.

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PGN

[Event "USA"]
[Site "USA"]
[Date "1955"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Larry Melvyn Evans"]
[Black "Nicolas Rossolimo"]
[ECO "C98"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "132"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 {White Salient: b2,c3,d2} O-O 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2 c5 {Black Reverse Salient: c5,d6,e5} 11.d4 Qc7 12.Nbd2 Nc6 13.d5 {White Advanced Chain: d5,e4 ... in the build-up to gaining an Advanced Salient} Nd8 14.a4 Rb8 15.c4 {White Advanced Salient: c4,d5,e4} b4 16.Kh2 Ne8 17.g4 g6 18.Rg1 f6 19.Nf1 Nf7 20.Ng3 Ng7 21.b3 {White Reverse Salient: a4,b3,c4} Bd7 22.Be3 Kh8 23.Qd2 Rbe8 24.Rg2 Qc8 25.Rh1 f5 26.gxf5 {White Advanced Reverse Salient: d5,e4,f5 ... albeit short lived. However, it shows how Advanced Reverse Salients are much more difficult to realise than the Advanced Salient, or either Salient or Reverse Salients formed in the pawn's own territory.} gxf5 27.exf5 Nxf5 28.Nxf5 Bxf5 29.Rhg1 Rg8 30.Ng5 Nxg5 31.Bxg5 Bxg5 32.Rxg5 Bxc2 33.Qxc2 Rxg5 34.Rxg5 Rf8 35.Qe2 Qd8 36.Rg4 Qf6 37.Kg2 Qf5 38.Qe3 Qf6 39.Qg3 Qf5 40.Qe3 Qf7 41.h4 Qf5 42.Qg3 Qf7 43.Qe3 Qf5 44.Kg3 Rf7 45.f3 Rf8 46.Kg2 Qc2+ 47.Kg3 Qf5 48.Re4 Rg8+ 49.Rg4 Rf8 50.Kg2 Qf7 51.Qe4 a5 52.Kf2 Qd7 53.Kg3 Rf6 54.h5 Qf7 55.Rh4 h6 56.Kf2 Rf5 57.Qg4 Qf6 58.Rh3 Rg5 59.Qe4 Qf7 60.Rh4 Rxh5 61.Qg4 Rxh4 62.Qxh4 Kg7 63.Qh3 Qf8 64.Qh4 Qf6 65.Qe4 Qf4 66.Qe1 Qh4+ 0-1

End.

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