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Advanced Salient
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4)

(Not featured in Point Count Chess)
Byrne v. Kotov, 1956

At one stage, in this example, White gets 2x Advanced Salients and 1x Advanced Reverse Salient, all within the one position. Both sides go on to force through a Passed Pawn, but neither is able to get their's Promoted, and eventually the two players settled matters by agreeing to declare the game a draw.

So it could be argued both sides were ultimately successful with their own respective Salient formations. While it makes no difference to the result of the game, perhaps you could say Black edged matters, as White had the supposed benefit of his structures being further up the board, in the Advanced position, and yet he still couldn't convert it into a game-winning advantage.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of a game that features a battle between Salient v. Reverse Salient:
  1. Advanced Salient v. Reverse Salient, after 15...e5
  2. Result of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4).
  3. Summary of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4).
  4. PGN

Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
After 15...e5

After: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.Bd3 O-O 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 Nc6 8.Ne2 b6 9.e4 Ne8 10.Be3 d6 11.O-O Ba6 12.Ng3 Na5 13.Qe2 Rc8 14.d5 Qd7 15.a4 e5

Point Count Chess - IE - Advanced Salients (Not Featured in Point Count Chess) - Example 2
After: 15...e5

1. White builds a 3 Pawn Phalanx, prior to gaining the
Advanced Salient

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 1.d4 to 4.e3
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 1.d4 to 4.e3
After 1.d4 to 4.e3, White has focused his initial moves, mostly developing Pawns for his intended Advanced Salient structure, and also ensuring there will be Pieces to support them:
  • 3.Nb1-c3, supports both Pawn pushes (d4-d5 & e3-e4), for the Advanced Salient;

  • Qd1 (without moving), supports the d4-Pawn, and its push to d5;

  • Bf1 (without moving), supports the c5-Pawn, which is already in its position to form part of the Base of the Advanced Salient.

Black has focused on clearing his back rank, ready to Castle early, on the Kingside. As happened in No.24, Black develops his King Knight to f6 (1...Ng8-f6). However, in a move that differs from No.24, Black chooses against Fianchettoing his dark-Bishop, which he instead brings out to Pin White's Nc3.

Incidentally, in No.24, White developed his e-Pawn straight out to the fourth rank, and into the 3-Pawn Phalanx. However, here, White delays the move, with 4.e2-e3, instead.

This cautious move is probably in anticipation of the potential loss of the Nc3, from Black's Bc4. If the capture takes place, and White's e-Pawn had been sent straight out to e4, it would have lost its defender (Nc3) and would be vulnerable to Black's Nf6.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 4...c5
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 4...c5
After 4...c5, Black develops his c-Pawn (4...c7-c5) to the position where it will form part of the 'van' of Black's Reverse Salient that will counter White's first Advanced Salient formation.

White won't (or perhaps shouldn't) capture (d4xc5), as it would strengthen Black's Center Pawns, giving him a 2-v-1 advantage.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 5.Bd3 O-O
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 5.Bd3 O-O
After 5.Bd3 O-O, White prepares to Castle Kingside, developing his King Bishop off the back rank (5.Bf1-d3), where it still maintains support for the c4-Pawn.

White's plan was to develop his King Knight to e2, which is why he moved his Bishop to d3, and not to e2.

Black Castles Kingside (5...O-O).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3
After 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3, the advance by White's a-Pawn (6.a2-a3) is the trigger for Black to exchange his dark-Bishop, to take-out White's Nc3 (6...Bb4xc3).

White's b-Pawn completes the trade (7.b2xc3), leaving the a-Pawn Isolated, and also giving White Doubled Pawns on the c-file (c3,c4).

However, in some cases, Doubled Pawns aren't the weakness they usually might be -- here, both of White's c-Pawns attack the Center, and they both support the d4-Pawn (the c3-Pawn defends it immediately; the c4-Pawn is ready to support it in, what will be, the Advanced Salient formation.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 7...Nc6 8.Ne2
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 7...Nc6 8.Ne2
After 7...Nc6 8.Ne2, Black develops his Queen Knight (7...Nb8-c6), adding a second unit that attacks White's d4-Pawn.

White develops his King Knight (8.Ng1-e2), reinforcing support for the d4-Pawn, while also clearing the back rank, enabling White to Castle Kingside, when ready.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 8..b6 9.e4
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 8..b6 9.e4
After 8..b6 9.e4, White forms his 3-Pawn Phalanx, in preparation for creating his first Advanced Salient.

Black pushes his b-Pawn (8...b7-b6), forming a Chain (a7,b6,c5), to reinforce support for the c5-Pawn. This was also seen in No.24.

White takes the opportunity to advance his e-Pawn a second time (9.e3-e4), to sit in the 3-Pawn Phalanx, where it will form the other half of the Base of his impending Advanced Salient (just waiting for the d4-d5 Pawn push).

2. Continued Development that leads to White's Advanced Salient vs. Black's Reverse Salient

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 9...Ne8
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 9...Ne8
After 9...Ne8, Black removes his Nf6 from a potential attack by White's e4-Pawn (e4-e5), but the move also clears a path for the f7-Pawn, as Black's intention would be to try and use it to take-out White's e4-Pawn (which will be the 'Base' Pawn in his Advanced Salient structure).
Note: as we shall see, below, White was quick to blockade Black's f-Pawn, stopping the attack on the Base of his Advanced Salient (e4), which was White's downfall in No.24.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 10.Be3 d6
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 10.Be3 d6
After 10.Be3 d6, White develops his dark-Bishop (10.Bc1-e3), increasing support for the d4-Pawn.

See how White has committed all available units to support the creation of the Advanced Salient:
  • c4- & e4-Pawns, in position to form the Base of White's Advanced Salient.

  • Bd3, supporting both c4- & e4-Pawns.

Black develops his d-Pawn (10...d7-d6), which is now in position to form the Base of the Reverse Salient that will oppose White's Advanced Salient. Black's d6-Pawn will support Black's e-Pawn, enabling it to be pushed to e5.

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 11.O-O to 13...Rc8
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 11.O-O to 13...Rc8
After 11.O-O to 13...Rc8, White Castles Kingside (11.O-O), and then the subsequent play all focuses around the attack and defence of the impending Salient formations:
  • Black attacks a Base Pawn (c4-Pawn: 11...Bc8-a6 » 12...Nc6-a5);

  • White defends a Base Pawn (e4-Pawn: 12.Ne2-g3);

  • Black defends a Van Pawn (c5-Pawn: 13...Ra8-c8).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 14.d5
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 14.d5
After 14.d5, White advances his d-Pawn (14.d4-d5), gaining his Advanced Salient (c4,d5,e4).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 14...Qd7 15.a4
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 14...Qd7 15.a4
After 14...Qd7 15.a4, Black develops his Queen (14...Qd8-d7), supporting a possible b-Pawn attack (...b6-b5) on the Base of White's Advanced Salient.

Supported by the Ra1, White advances his a-Pawn (15.a2-a4), to guard the b5-square, in case of said attack from Black's b-Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 15...e5
The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 15...e5
After 15...e5, Black advances his e-Pawn (15...e6-e5), gaining his Reverse Salient (c5,d6,e5), which now opposes White's Advanced Salient formation.

This wasn't the only Advanced Salient formation in the game. The Result, below, shows how White proceeded to develop an Advanced Reverse Salient and a second Advanced Salient formation, in an attempt to preserve his original Advanced Salient, while keeping Black from attacking down the Kingside ...

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4)...

3. White gains his Advanced Reverse Salient formation

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 16.f4 f6 17.f5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 16.f4 f6 17.f5
After 16.f4 f6 17.f5, White gains his Advanced Reverse Salient (d6,e4,f6), as he reacts quickly to prevent Black's f-Pawn attacking the e4-Pawn, at the Base of his Advanced Salient (c4,d5,e4).

White pushes his f-Pawn into position, in two successive moves (16.f2-f4 » 17.f4-f5), forming the Advanced Reverse Salient.
Note the White units that were already in position, to support his Advanced Reverse Salient (c4- & e4-Pawns; Bd3, Rf1 & Ng3).

Meanwhile, Black appeared reluctant to attack White's e4-Pawn (e.g. ...f7-f5), choosing instead to defend his e5-Pawn (16...f7-f6), which is part of his Reverse Salient that's blockading White's Advanced Salient.

Black's f6-Pawn will form the Base of a second Reverse Salient that will blockade White's second Advanced Salient, which is in the process of being formed (e4,f5, plus g2-g4).

4. White gains his second Advanced Salient formation

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 18.Rf3 to 20.Rh3
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 18.Rf3 to 20.Rh3
After 18.Rf3 to 20.Rh3, White prepares to push his g-Pawn into his second Advanced Salient, by rearranging the positions of his Rf1 & Ng3.

White lifts the Rook (18.Rf1-f3), replaces it with the Knight (19.Ng3-f1), and then pushes his Rook out to the h-file (20.Rf3-h3), to attack Black's h-Pawn.

White's Rh3 will ensure Black's h-Pawn won't come down to take-out White's g-Pawn, when it's pushed up to g4, as it'll leave the h-file Half-open, for the benefit of White and his Rh3 to invade.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 20...Rh8 21.g4
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 20...Rh8 21.g4
After 20...Rh8 21.g4, White gains his second Advanced Salient (e4,f5,g4). In this one position, White now has 2x Advanced Salients and 1x Advanced Reverse Salient.

Black is forced bring his Rook across (20...Rf8-h8), to defend his h7-Pawn, which was unprotected and under attack from White's Rh3.

White then pushes his g-Pawn (21.g2-g4), forming his second Advanced Salient formation.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 21...Kc7 to 28.Nd2
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 21...Kc7 to 28.Nd2
After 21...Kc7 to 28.Nd2, all the action is with the Pieces, as both sides try to look for a way to break through the large wall of Pawns.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 28...g5 » 30...h6
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 28...g5 » 30...h6
After 28...g5, Black completes his last Reverse Salient formation (e5,f6, 28...g7-g5) to counter White's Kingside Advanced Salient (e4,f5,g4).

5. Play that leads to the destruction of all opposing
Salient structures

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 31.Nh5 Bxh5 32.gxh5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 31.Nh5 Bxh5 32.gxh5
After 31.Nh5 Bxh5 32.gxh5, White causes the destruction of his Kingside Advanced Salient, as he looks to break the current Pawn stalemate.

White chooses to act first, playing for an exchange of Minor Pieces (31.Ng3-h5 Be8xh5) that removes the g4-Pawn from the Base of its Advanced Salient, which is destroyed, as White's g-Pawn completes the trade (32.g4xh5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 37...a6 and 41...b5 42.axb5 axb5 43.cxb5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 37...a6 » 41...b5 42.axb5 axb5 43.cxb5
After 37...a6 » 41...b5 42.axb5 axb5 43.cxb5, Black forces White to destroy his Queenside Advanced Salient, with a Pawn advance that attacks the Salient's Base (c4-Pawn).

Black advances his a- & b-Pawns (37...a7-a6 » 41...b6-b5), forcing White into an exchange of Pawns (42.a4xb5 a6xb5), which leads to White removing his c4-Pawn from the Base of its Advanced Salient, to complete the Pawn trade (43.c4xb5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 43...Rxb5 to 45.c4
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 43...Rxb5 to 45.c4
After 43...Rxb5 to 45.c4, White regains his Queenside Advanced Salient, but it's only a temporary measure.

Black chooses to exchange Rooks, by capturing White's b5-Pawn (43...Rb8xb5 44.Rb2xb5). When Black's Queen completes the trade (44...Qe8xb5), White pushes his second c-Pawn (45.c3-c4), attacking Black's Qb5, while slotting into the Base position of the Queenside Advanced Salient (c4,d5,e4).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 45...Qxc4+ 46.Qxc4 Nxc4
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 45...Qxc4+ 46.Qxc4 Nxc4
After 45...Qxc4+ 46.Qxc4 Nxc4, White's Queenside Advanced Salient is destroyed, for a second time. This time, it's permanent.

Black opts to remove the second c4-Pawn, with his Queen (45...Qb5xc4+), to provoke White into exchanging Queens (46.Qa2xc4), with Black's Knight completing the trade (46...Na5xc4).

Now, only White's Advanced Reverse Salient (d5,e4,f5) remains, but not for much longer.
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 47.Bxg5 Nxf5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 47.Bxg5 Nxf5
After 47.Bxg5 Nxf5, Black destroys White's Advanced Reverse Salient.

White plays to force a Passed Pawn (f- or h-Pawns), by sacrificing his dark-Bishop, to capture Black's g5-Pawn (47.Bd2xg5).

Rather than capture White's Bg5 immediately, Black delays it, to remove one of White's Pawns that could otherwise become a Passed Pawn ...

Black's Ng7 is sacrificed to take-out White's f5-Pawn (47...Ng7xf5), which destroys White's Advanced Reverse Salient, in the process.

6. Each side gains a Passed Pawn, but the game still ends in a Draw

Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 48.exf5 fxg5
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 48.exf5 fxg5
After 48.exf5 fxg5, there's a chance of victory, as both sides gain Passed Pawns, in the process of completing their respective Minor Piece swaps.

Black's e-Pawn becomes a Passed Pawn, as White completes the trade that captures Black's Knight (48.e4xf5).

White's newly landed f-Pawn becomes a Passed Pawn, as Black completes the trade that captures White's Bishop (48...f6xg5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Example 2 - The Advanced Salient, Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4), After 56.Rb3+
(RESULT) The Advanced Salient,
Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4),
After 56.Rb3+
After 56.Rb3+, both sides agree to call the game a Draw, with neither side able to get their Passed Pawns Promoted.

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

Summary of the Salient v. Reverse Salient (2 of 4)...

  1. After gaining the Advanced Salient (c4,d5,e4), on the Queenside, White was quick to maintain it, by advancing his f-Pawn (16.f2-f4 » 17.f4-f5), to prevent Black's f-Pawn destroying the structure, by attacking White's e4-Pawn. The double push of the f-Pawn created White's Advanced Reverse Salient (d5,e4,f5).

  2. To maintain both Advanced Salient formations, White had to create a second Advanced Salient, with the advance of his g-Pawn (21.g2-g4), in order to protect the f5-Pawn that was part of the 'van' of his Advanced Reverse Salient, which had been formed to prevent the premature destruction of White's first Advanced Salient. The entire structure caused a Pawn stalemate, due to the mass of interlocking enemy Pawns.

  3. The destruction of all the Advanced Salient structures led to the creation of a Passed Pawn, for each side. But, neither side was able to get their Passed Pawns Promoted, and a Draw was eventually agreed.

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

PGN

[Event "Match \\"]
[Site "Match \\"]
[Date "1954"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Robert Eugene Byrne"]
[Black "Alexander Kotov"]
[ECO "E29"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "111"]
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 {Black Salient: d7,e6,f7} 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.Bd3 O-O 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 {White Salient: c3,d4,e3} Nc6 8.Ne2 b6 9.e4 {White 3-Pawn Phalanx, in place to form an Advanced Salient, via d4-d5.} Ne8 10.Be3 d6 {Black Salient: b6,c5,d6 ... this Salient forms as the original, d7,e6,f7 Salient is dissolved.} 11.O-O Ba6 12.Ng3 Na5 13.Qe2 Rc8 14.d5 {White Advanced Salient: c4,d5,e4} Qd7 15.a4 e5 {Black Reverse Salient: c5,d6,e5} 16.f4 f6 17.f5 {White Advanced Reverse Salient: d5,e4,f5 ... White now has both an Advanced Salient AND an Advanced Reverse Salient.} Kf7 18.Rf3 Ke7 19.Nf1 Kd8 20.Rh3 Rh8 21.g4 Kc7 22.Ng3 Kb8 23.Kf2 Nc7 24.Qa2 Rcd8 25.Rg1 Qe7 26.Be2 Bc8 27.Nf1 Bd7 28.Nd2 g5 29.Nf1 Be8 30.Ng3 h6 31.Nh5 Bxh5 32.gxh5 Ne8 33.Bg4 Ng7 34.Ke2 Kc7 35.Kd3 Ra8 36.Rb1 Rhb8 37.Rb2 a6 38.Kc2 Qd7 39.Rg3 Qe8 40.Bd2 Ra7 41.Rh3 b5 42.axb5 axb5 43.cxb5 Rxb5 44.Rxb5 Qxb5 45.c4 Qxc4+ 46.Qxc4 Nxc4 47.Bxg5 Nxf5 48.exf5 fxg5 49.f6 e4 50.f7 Ra8 51.Rc3 Ne5 52.Ra3 Rf8 53.Be6 Kb6 54.Rb3+ Kc7 55.Ra3 Kb6 56.Rb3+ 1/2-1/2

End.

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