« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples

Strong Outpost Station
The Station at K5 (1 of 2)

NO. 97 ... p143, The Station at K5,
Milner Barry v. Znosko Borovsky, 1928

The Station at K5 (e5) is ideal when gearing-up for an attack on Black's Kingside Castled King.

White's Kingside Knight (Ng1) is the primary candidate for occupation of the e5-Outpost, being just two hops away (Ng1-f3-e5).

It appears that to make good use of the e5-Outpost, you must combine its creation with weakening Black's Pawn Guards in front of their King.

All is revealed in the following analysis ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.143, No. 97, after 13...hxg6
  2. Result of the Station at K5 (e5).
  3. PGN

The Station at K5 (e5) ... (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.143, No. 97, after 13...hxg6

After: 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 Nc6 5.c3 Nf6 6.Bf4 Bg4 7.Nf3 e6 8.Qb3 Qc8 9.Nbd2 Be7 10.O-O O-O 11.h3 Bh5 12.Rae1 Bg6 13.Bxg6 hxg6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Page 143
After: 13...hxg6

For this analysis, I'm looking at the Pawns and Pieces that contribute to White's Outpost Station; their first moves and their last positions (whether they get captured or remain there for the duration of the example) ...

1. White's: e-Pawn ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 1.e4 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's e-Pawn,
After: 1.e4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 3.exd5 cxd5 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's e-Pawn,
After: 3.exd5 cxd5

White's e-Pawn helps create Black's Pawn Chain structure (3.exd5 cxd5) that enables White to gain the Outpost at e5. Black is almost compelled to support his new d5-Pawn with his e-Pawn, via 7...e7-e6.

2. White's: d-Pawn ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 2.d4 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's d-Pawn,
After: 2.d4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 2.d4 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's d-Pawn,
After: 2.d4

White's d-Pawn secures the e5-Outpost, from d4, and remains there all the way through to the end of the game (White's victory).

3. White's: Bf1 (Light-Bishop, Kingside) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 4.Bd3 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Bf1,
After: 4.Bd3
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 13.Bxg6 hxg6 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Bf1,
After: 13.Bxg6 hxg6

White's light-Bishop is sacrificed to complete two objectives:

  1. First, it's traded off the board in exchange for Black's own light-Bishop (12...Bh5-g6 13.Bd3xg6 h7xg6).

  2. Second, as shown by Black's 13th Move (13...h7xg6), White's light-Bishop is sacrificed to rupture the Pawn Defence surrounding Black's King. This is the moment Black gets a Compromised King-side, and it plays a significant role in White's victory.

4. White's: c-Pawn ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 5.c3 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's c-Pawn,
After: 5.c3
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 20...bxc3 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's c-Pawn,
After: 20...bxc3

With 5.c2-c3, White's c-Pawn moves into the Chain structure (b2,c3,d4) that ultimately strengthens White's e5-Outpost, due to its support of the d4-Pawn.

White's c-Pawn eventually gets captured off the board (20...b4xc3), but this only serves to Open the c-file, for the benefit of one of White's Rooks, which goes on to become an advantage in its own right (Pawn on the 7th Rank, after 26.Rc3-c7), and a contributor to White's victory.

5. White's: Bc1 (Dark-Bishop, Queenside) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 6.Bf4 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Bc1,
After: 6.Bf4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 17.Bxe5 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Bc1,
After: 17.Bxe5

White's dark-Bishop waits at f4 until the sequence that sees all four adverse Knights traded off the board, on e5 (14.Nf3-e5 Nf6-d7 15.Nd2-f3 Nc6xe5 16.Nf3xe5 Nd7xe5), with White's Bf4 completing the trade (17.Bf4xe5) to end up occupying the e5-Outpost, where it remains to the end of the game.

6. White's: Ng1 (Kingside Knight) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 7.Nf3 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Ng1,
After: 7.Nf3
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 15...Ncxe5 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Ng1,
After: 14.Ne5 → 15...Ncxe5

As already mentioned, White's Kingside Knight is destined to be sacrificed to help rid the board of all adverse Knights.

This Knight waits patiently at f3 until White's light-Bishop has caused Black to create the Doubled Pawns on the g-file (g7,g6).

Without delay, as soon as Black has the Compromised King-side, White's Nf3 goes to occupy the e5-Outpost (14.Nf3-e5), which leads to a maneuvering of the adverse Knights, until the point when they trade each other off the board, with White's Bf4 clearing-up (14...Nf6-d7 15.Nd2-f3 Nc6xe5 16.Nf3xe5 Nd7xe5 17.Bf4xe5).

7. White's: Qd1 ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 8.Qb3 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Qd1,
After: 8.Qb3
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 25.Qg6 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Qd1,
After: 19.Qd1 → 24.Qh5 → 25.Qg6

The first move of White's Queen (8.Qd1-b3) has two purposes:

  1. First, her attack on Black's undefended b7-Pawn forces Black to spend a move defending the Pawn, instead of developing strongly elsewhere. This buys time for the second purpose ...
  2. Second, White's Queen to clear off her Back Rank, to get the Rooks Connected (the Queenside Rook plays its part in defending the e5-Outpost, from e1, after 12.Ra1-e1).

White's Queen eventually comes back down to d1 (19.Qb3-d1), before going up and across to Black's Compromised King-side (24.Qd1-h5). But that's after all the adverse Knights have been traded off the board, and Black has created the Hole at g6.

In fact, this looks significant, as the creation of the g6-Hole comes about when Black's f-Pawn launches forward to attack White's dark-Bishop occupying the e5-Outpost.

Perhaps this is ultimate purpose of White's Bishop? ... to be the temptation for Black's f7-Pawn, to coax it forward, removing the last guard from the g6-square, and creating that Hole which White's Queen takes full advantage of, (25.Qh5-g6), helping White to claim the win.

8. White's: Nb1 (Queenside Knight) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 9.Nbd2 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Nb1,
After: 9.Nbd2
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Nb1,
After: 15.Ndf3 → 16.Nxe5 Nxe5

White's Queenside Knight, like its Kingside counterpart, is destined to be sacrificed, in order to remove all adverse Knights off the board.

Early on, all the moves by White's Queenside Knight are about getting into position to replace White's Kingside Knight on the f3-square:

White's Queenside Knight is off the board after 16.Nf3xe5 Nd7xe5.

9. White's: Ra1 (Queenside Rook) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 12.Rae1 - First Move
(FIRST MOVE) White's Ra1,
After: 12.Rae1
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Strong Outpost Station, After 26.Rc7 - Last Position
(LAST POSITION) White's Ra1,
After: 18.Re3 → 26.Rc7

Once the Back Rank path has been cleared, White's Queenside Rook moves across to e1 (12.Ra1-e1) and plays its part in supporting the e5-Outpost.

White's Queenside Rook only removes itself from supporting the e5-Outpost, when it needs to advance to e3 (18.Re1-e3), to support the c3-Pawn, while White's Queen makes her way back down to d1, from b3 (19.Qb3-d1).

After completing the Pawn exchange on c3 (20...b4xc3 21.Re3xc3), White's Queenside Rook finds itself up on the 7th Rank, playing its part in the victory (26.Rc3-c7).


[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of White's Outpost Station at K5 (e5) ... (1 of 2)

The images, (below), shows my analysis of H&M-S's image (NO. 97), at the position where White has his Outpost Station at K5 (e5) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Result, After 13...hxg6 - No Highlights
(RESULT) White's
Outpost Station at K5 (e5),
After: 13...hxg6
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - Result, After 13...hxg6
(RESULT) White's
Outpost Station at K5 (e5),
After: 13...hxg6

With the Outpost on the e-file (e5), it's the two adjacent files (d & f), that you must look at to check for any Pawns that would otherwise threaten the existence of any Piece on the Outpost -- remember, if an enemy Pawn is able to chase away your Piece, you don't have a Strong Outpost Station.

In the image, (above-right), we can see that Black has a Pawn on the d-file, but it cannot threaten e5, because it's already passed out of attacking range. While, on the other flank, Black's f-Pawn isn't a threat while his Knight remains blocking it on f6. So, with support from the d4-Pawn, White claims the Strong Outpost Station at K5 (e5).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 97 - No Strong Outpost at K5, Result, After 14...Nd7
(RESULT) White's
Outpost at K5 (e5) dissolves,
After: 14...Nd7
As shown in the image, (left), it's worth noting that White's Strong Outpost at K5 (e5) dissolves the moment Black's f7-Pawn gets a clear sight of the attacking point, at f6 (after 14...Nf6-d7).

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

PGN

[Event "Tenby Major op"]
[Site "WLS"]
[Date "1928.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Milner-Barry"]
[Black "Znosko-Borovsky"]
[ECO "B13"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "51"]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 Nc6 5.c3 Nf6 6.Bf4 Bg4 7.Nf3 e6 8.Qb3 Qc8 9.Nbd2 Be7 10.O-O O-O 11.h3 Bh5 12.Rae1 Bg6 13.Bxg6 hxg6 {PCC p.143 No. 97}14.Ne5 Nd7 15.Ndf3 Ncxe5 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Bxe5 Qc6 18.Re3 b5 19.Qd1 b4 20.h4 bxc3 21. Rxc3 Qb6 22.h5 g5 23.h6 f6 24.Qh5 Bd8 25.Qg6 Qb7 26.Rc7 1-0

End.

« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples