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Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.86A to NO.86B, p125-126
Darga v. Toran, 1955

In this example, Black incurs a vulnerable Hole on the Kingside (h6), after:

  1. Advancing his Kingside P-N3 (...g7-g6), to prepare for the Fianchetto of his dark-Bishop;

  2. Fianchettoing his dark-Bishop (...Bf8-g7), so it takes over guard duty of the f6- & h6-squares, from Black's g-Pawn;

  3. Castling Kingside (...O-O);

  4. Losing his Fianchettoed Bg7, in an exchange for White's Nc3.

With his g-Pawn advanced without ability to return, and with the dark-Bishop no longer on the board to guard from g7, the h6-square, on Black's Kingside, becomes a Hole. White exploits this by posting his dark-Bishop onto the h6-Hole, which forces Black to displace his Castled King Rook (...Rf8-e8) and guards the f8-square, preventing Black's King from fleeing to the Queenside.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.125, No.86A, after 11.Bf3
  2. PCC, p.126, No.86B, after 20.Qh4
  3. Result of the Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2).
  4. Summary of the Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2).
  5. PGN

The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.125, No.86A, after 11.Bf3

After: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 O-O 6.f4 c5 7.Nf3 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Nc6 9.Nc2 Nd7 10.O-O Nc5 11.Bf3

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86A - Page 125
After: 11.Bf3

1. How Black incurs a vulnerable Hole, on the Kingside, at h6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 1.d4 to 2...g6
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 1.d4 to 2...g6
After 1.d4 to 2...g6, Black's g-Pawn is advanced to its N3 square (2...g7-g6), in preparation for Fianchettoing his dark-Bishop.

By advancing, Black's g-Pawn no longer defends the h6-square; Black is now reliant on his dark-Bishop, for guarding it.

Black has also mobilized his King Knight (1...Ng8-f6), in preparation for Castling Kingside.

While Black focuses on early Castling to the Kingside, White takes the opportunity to advance his c- & d-Pawns, into Phalanx formation, on their fourth rank (1.d2-d4 » 2.c2-c4). Furthermore, White's dark-Bishop (Bc1) can now see all the way up to the h6-square, which eventually becomes the Hole that White's dark-Bishop comes to occupy.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 3.Nc3 Bg7
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 3.Nc3 Bg7
After 3.Nc3 Bg7, Black's King is ready to be Castled Kingside, after Black's dark-Bishop is Fianchettoed (3...Bf8-g7); it takes up occupancy of the square vacated by the advance of Black's g-Pawn, and also takes over guard duty of both the f6- & h6-squares.

White continues to build on the Queenside, with the advance of his Knight (3.Nb1-c3). While it currently supports a potential push of his d-Pawn, into an Advanced Chain structure, White's Nc3 eventually becomes part of the Minor Piece exchange, that removes Black's dark-Bishop from the board, causing the h6-square to become a vulnerable Hole.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 4.e4 to 5...O-O
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 4.e4 to 5...O-O
After 4.e4 to 5...O-O, Black's King is Castled Kingside (5...O-O), completing the stronghold (this is the "House" structure that Yasser Seirawan is keen to recommend).

In the build-up to Black's Castling, the advance of White's e-Pawn (4.e2-e4) causes Black to advance his d-Pawn (4...d7-e6), to prevent White's e4-Pawn advancing again, to attack Black's Nf6. However, White's e4-Pawn, together with his c4- & d4-Pawns, makes for a formidable 3-Pawn Phalanx, on his 4th rank.

White also develops his light-Bishop (5.Bf1-e2), as he also makes preparations to Castle to the Kingside (note: first, White's light-Bishop prevents Black's Nf6 from advancing down the Kingside; secondly, it never leaves the d1-h5 diagonal, throughout the remainder of the game).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 6.f4 c5 7.Nf3
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 6.f4 c5 7.Nf3
After 6.f4 c5 7.Nf3, White's advances his f-Pawn to its 4th Rank (6.f2-f4), creating an even larger 4-Pawn Phalanx on the edge of Black's territory.

Note: the advance of White's f-Pawn comes before the development of his King Knight (7.Ng1-f3). Done the other way round (Knight out first), and White wouldn't even have been able to push his f-Pawn to the third rank.

Black prepares to cut down the size of White's 4-Pawn Phalanx, by advancing his c-Pawn (6...c7-c5), prior to forcing the exchange on d4.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 7...cxd4 to 9.Nc2
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 7...cxd4 to 9.Nc2
After 7...cxd4 to 9.Nc2, Black carries out his threat and forces the exchange of Pawns, on d4 (7...c5xd4), which is completed by White's King Knight (8.Nf3xd4).

Black then develops his Queen Knight (8...Nb8-c6) and simultaneously attacks White's Nd4, presenting White with the opportunity to exchange Knights, but White declines this, choosing instead to retreat his Knight to the relative safety of White's camp, down on the Queenside (9.Nd4-c2).

Note: the exchange of Pawns, on d4, has left White's Nc3 without Pawn cover, with Black's Bg7 now X-Raying through his Nf6, toward White's Nc3. At first, this may seem like a vulnerability that White might want to rectify; however, as it turns out, with the b2-Pawn in support, White's Nc3 seems to be the bait that will tempt Black's Bg7 away from guarding the h6-Hole.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 9...Nd7 to 11.Bf3
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 9...Nd7 to 11.Bf3
After 9...Nd7 to 11.Bf3, we see the final position, before Black's dark-Bishop is tempted to leave its duty of guarding the f6- & h6-squares, to exchange itself for White's Nc3, with the loss of Black's Bg7 turning the h6-square into a Hole.

In successive moves, Black relocates his King Knight, to the c5-Outpost (9...Nf6-d7 » 10...Nd7-c5). The first of those two Knight moves also served to uncover Black's Bg7, which now directly attacks White's Nc3 ...

The move of the Knight to the c5-Outpost is to apply pressure against White's e4-Pawn (at this point, only the attacked Nc3 was defending it).

Instead of trying to further protect his Nc3, White leaves it exposed to the threat from Black's Bg7, and takes the opportunity to Castle Kingside (10.O-O).

White also moves his light-Bishop for a second time (11.Be2-f3), to increase support for White's e4-Pawn, in view of the pressure from Black's Nc5.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), Important
IMPORTANT: The current arrangement of White's 4th Rank Pawns & the Nc3, explains why Black decides to exchange his Bg7, for White's Nc3, thus allowing the h6-Hole to develop.

Black's Center Pawns are hindered from either developing or expanding, and this causes Cramp since his Pieces their mobility is restricted behind the Pawns.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 11...Bxc3 12.bxc3
Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 11...Bxc3 12.bxc3
After 11...Bxc3 12.bxc3, the h6-square becomes a vulnerable Hole, in close proximity to Black's Castled King, after Black decides to remove his Bg7 from its square-guarding duty, to exchange it for White's Nc3 (11...Bg7xc3).

White incurs Doubled c-Pawns, as a result of his b-Pawn completing that exchange (12.b2xc3). However, it doesn't appear to be a weak Doubled Pawn structure, for two reasons:
  1. the c4-Pawn prevents the advance of either Black's b- or d-Pawns (White would get to un-double his Doubled Pawns, with either c4xb5 or c5xd5);

  2. the c3-Pawn supports White's Nc2, in preventing Black's Nc6 from marauding into White's territory, at either b4 or d4.

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The Result of the Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2)...

2. How White takes advantage of Black's h6-Hole

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 12...Qa5 13.f5
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 12...Qa5 13.f5
After 12...Qa5 13.f5, Black applies pressure the rear portion of White's Doubled Pawns, with his Queen (12...Qd8-a5).

Despite it being totally unguarded, White ignores the attack on his c3-Pawn, to push his f-Pawn into an Advanced position, taking advantage of the support that's provided within the Advanced Chain structure (e4,f5), to attack Black's g6-Pawn.

The advance of White's f-Pawn (13.f4-f5) also serves to clear the c1-h6 diagonal, so that White's dark-Bishop can be posted to the h6-Hole.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 13...Qxc3 14.Bh6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 13...Qxc3 14.Bh6
After 13...Qxc3 14.Bh6, Black's Queen carries out her threat and captures White's Pawn (13...Qa5xc3).

White then posts his dark-Bishop to the h6-Hole (14.Bc1-h6), deep inside Black's territory; it now sits attacking Black's Rf8.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 14...Re8
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 14...Re8
After 14...Re8, because of the attack by White's Bishop on the h6-Hole, Black's King Rook needs to move anyway, and so goes to the e-file (14...Rf8-e8), to support a potential e-Pawn advance:
  • ...e7-e6 attacks White's f5-Pawn;

  • ...e7-e5 blockades White's Backward e4-Pawn (at the expense of Black's d6-Pawn becoming Backward, also).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 15.Ne3 to 17...Qb6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 15.Ne3 to 17...Qb6
After 15.Ne3 to 17...Qb6, we see a period of play, where Black tries to find a way to develop through the Center, before switching to try and stop White's Kingside attack.

First, Black tries applying pressure to White's Backward e4-Pawn, with his Queen (15...Qc3-d4), while also attacking White's Knight, which had come across to the Kingside (15.Nc2-e3) to help support White's f5-Pawn.

However, White's Queen moves to protect the Knight (16.Qd1-e1), and then White's Queen Rook comes to the d-file (17.Ra1-d1), attacking Black's Queen, which is forced to retreat (17...Qd4-b6).

Black's attack is thwarted, and he is forced to try something different ...


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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.126, No.86B, after 20.Qh4

After: 11...Bxc3 12.bxc3 Qa5 13.f5 Qxc3 14.Bh6 Re8 15.Ne3 Qd4 16.Qe1 Nd7 17.Rd1 Qb6 18.Kh1 Nf6 19.Bg5 Ne5 20.Qh4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86B - Page 126
After: 20.Qh4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 18...Nf6 to 20...Kg7
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 18...Nf6 to 20...Kg7
After 18...Nf6 to 20...Kg7, Black tries to bring his Knights through the gaps of the central dark-squares (18...Nd7-f6 » 19...Nc6-e5, to defend against White's increasing Kingside invasion.

This appears to be working, as White is forced to take his dark-Bishop off the h6-Hole (19.Bh6-g5), to come and deal with one of those Black Knights. And as White's Queen moves towards Black's territory on the h-file (20.Qe1-h4), Black seems content put his King to work, to defend his Backward h-Pawn (20...Kg8-g7).

But, White is able to force Black to remove his defending Knights, which weakness Black's ability to defend his vulnerable Kingside position ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 21.Be2 Ned7
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 21.Be2 Ned7
After 21.Be2 Ned7, White forces Black to remove his Ne5 from helping defend the Kingside.

First, White moves his light-Bishop off the f-file (21.Bf3-e2), so his Rf1 is in prime position, if/when the f-file becomes fully Open.

This forces Black to retract his Ne5 (21...Ne5-d7), to give support to Black's Nf6, which is still under attack from White's Bg5.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 22.Nd5 Nxd5
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 22.Nd5 Nxd5
After 22.Nd5 Nxd5, White forces Black to remove his Nf6 from helping defend the Backward h7-Pawn.

White plays a Relative Knight Fork (22.Ne3-d5), which snares Black's Queen (Qb6) and forces Black's Nf6 to capture White's Knight (22...Nf6xd5).

This results in the removal of the last remaining Kingside guard of Black's Backward h7-Pawn, (besides the King, of course, which makes Black's defence of his Kingside even more awkward).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 86 - (RESULT) Holes - The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2), After 23.fxg6
(RESULT) Holes
The Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2),
After 23.fxg6
After 23.fxg6, Black resigns, as White's f5-Pawn finally completes its threat and captures Black's g6-Pawn (23.f5xg6).

Black cannot prevent White's Queen from either safely moving onto the h6-Hole, or onto h7 (capturing Black's Backward h7-Pawn, in the process), with Checkmate to come swiftly, as Black's King can only retreat to his unprotected back rank.

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Summary of the Holes after P-N3 (1 of 2)...

  1. Black incurs a vulnerable Hole, on the Kingside, at h6, after:

    1. Advancing his Kingside P-N3 (2...g7-g6), to prepare for the Fianchetto of his dark-Bishop;

    2. Fianchettoing his dark-Bishop (3...Bf8-g7), so it takes over guard duty of the f6- & h6-squares, from Black's g-Pawn;

    3. Castling Kingside (5...O-O);

    4. Losing his Fianchettoed Bg7, in an exchange for White's Nc3 (11...Bg7xc3), which leaves the h6-square unguarded, making it a Hole. But, the true significance of this particular Hole is its proximity to Black's Castled King.


  2. White takes advantage of Black's h6-Hole, by:

    1. Posting his dark-Bishop onto the h6-Hole (14.Bc1-h6), which forces Black's Rook to move off the f-file (14...Rf8-e8), and also prevents Black's King from fleeing to the Queenside (Black's King is now stuck on the Kingside, which makes it easier for White to focus his attack against Black's King).

    2. Bringing his Queen to the h-file (20.Qe1-h4), to apply pressure against Black's Backward h7-Pawn.

    3. Forcing Black to remove his two Knights from trying to help their King defend the Kingside, against White's mounting attack. White, first moves his light-Bishop off the f-file (21.Bf3-e2), so his Rf1 is in prime position, if/when the f-file becomes fully Open. This forces Black to retract his Ne5 (21...Ne5-d7), to give support to Black's Nf6, which is still under attack from White's Bg5. White then plays a Relative Knight Fork (22.Ne3-d5), which snares Black's Queen (Qb6) and forces Black's Nf6 to capture White's Knight (22...Nf6xd5). This results in the removal of the last remaining Kingside guard of Black's Backward h7-Pawn.

    4. Capturing Black's g6-Pawn, with his f5 (23.f5xg6). This resulted in Black's resignation, since he cannot prevent White's Queen from either safely moving onto the h6-Hole, or onto h7 (capturing Black's Backward h7-Pawn, in the process), with Checkmate to come swiftly, as Black's King can only retreat to his unprotected back rank.


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PGN

[Event "EU-Cup Gr3"]
[Site "Luxembourg"]
[Date "1955.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Klaus V Darga"]
[Black "Roman Toran Albero"]
[ECO "E78"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "45"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 O-O 6.f4 c5 7.Nf3 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Nc6 9.Nc2 Nd7 10.O-O Nc5 11.Bf3 {PCC p.125 No.86A} Bxc3 12.bxc3 Qa5 13.f5 Qxc3 14.Bh6 Re8 15.Ne3 Qd4 16.Qe1 Nd7 17.Rd1 Qb6 18.Kh1 Nf6 19.Bg5 Ne5 20.Qh4 {PCC p.126 No.86B} Kg7 21.Be2 Ned7 22.Nd5 Nxd5 23.fxg6 1-0

End.

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