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Hanging Pawns
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.84A & NO.84C, p119-121
Lessing v. Denker, 1938

See No.84A (1 of 2) for full details of how Black invited White to advance his Pawns, until they became Hanging Pawns.

In No.84B (1 of 2), White tried to play his way out of trouble by not capturing Black's d6-Pawn, which had come out to attack White's Advanced e5-Pawn.

This example (No.84C) shows how White risks incurring an Isolated d-Pawn, or having to make a "premature advance" of his c-Pawn, to c5, if he does try to capture Black's d6-Pawn, with his Advanced e5-Pawn.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.119, No.84A, after 4.d4
  2. PCC, p.120, No.84C, after 10.Nce2
  3. Result of Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2).
  4. Summary Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2).
  5. PGN

Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.119, No.84A, after 4.d4

After: 1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.c4 Nb6 4.d4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84A - Page 119
After: 1.d4

1. How Black invites White's Pawns to Advance, causing them to become Hanging Pawns (that aren't Isolated)

See No.84A (1 of 2) for full details of how Black invited White to advance his Pawns, until they became Hanging Pawns.

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The Result of Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2)...

2. How Black takes advantage of White's Hanging Pawns, if White tries to capture his way out of trouble, with 5.e5xd6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 4...d6
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 4...d6
After 4...d6, we see the same position from No.84B, where Black develops his d-Pawn, to attack White's Advanced e5-Pawn.

In No.84B, White tried to play his way out of trouble by not initially capturing Black's d6-Pawn, which had come out to attack White's Advanced e5-Pawn. Instead, White played 5.Ng1-f3.

Next, we see how White might be affected, if he chooses to capture Black's d6-Pawn, with his Advanced e5-Pawn ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 1.x
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 1.x
After 5.exd6 cxd6, White decides to get rid of his Advanced e5-Pawn, to break the tension, forcing an exchange of Pawns, on d6 (5.e5xd6 c6xd6).

This leaves Black with 2-v-1 in the Center.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 6.Nc3 to 7...Bg7
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 6.Nc3 to 7...Bg7
After 6.Nc3 to 7...Bg7, both sides continue further development of their Minor Pieces:
  • White's focus: developing to help defend his Hanging Pawns;

  • Black's focus: developing to build pressure against White's Hanging Pawns.

White develops both Queenside Minor Pieces, with his Queen Knight (6.Nb1-c3) coming out to support a potential push of White's d4-Pawn; while White's Queen Bishop (7.Bc1-e3) reinforces support for White's d4-Pawn. Both White Pieces have cleared the back rank, ready for White's Queen Rook to come to the c-file.

Black advances his g-Pawn (6...g7-g6) and then Fianchettoes his King Bishop (7...Bf8-g7), which applies pressure against White's d4-Pawn. Black has also cleared the back rank and is ready to Castle Kingside.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 8.Rc1 O-O
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 8.Rc1 O-O
After 8.Rc1 O-O, White brings his Queen Rook to the c-file (8.Ra1-c1), in anticipation of it becoming fully Open.

Black takes the opportunity to Castle Kingside (8...O-O).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 9.Bd3 Nc6 10.Nce2
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 9.Bd3 Nc6 10.Nce2
After 9.Bd3 Nc6 10.Nce2, White prepares to push his c-Pawn into Black's territory, developing his light-Bishop (9.Bf1-d3), first, so that he can relocate his Queen Knight out of the way of White's Rc1, and into a position to support White's d4-Pawn (10.Nc3-e2).

In between White's two moves, Black applies more pressure against White's d4-Pawn, with the development of his Queen Knight (9...Nb8-c6). But that's not all: Black's Nc6 will also serve to blockade White's c-Pawn, if/when it gets pushed to c5.
According to H&M-S, White's d4-Pawn is important as it guards e5 (against the advance of Black's e-Pawn), while it also supports White's intended push of his c-Pawn, to c5.

H&M-S also suggest White has made a mistake, with these moves and his intention to push his c-Pawn, saying: "...he is too ambitious; he should have made a concession to safety," as follows:


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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.120, No.84C, after 10.Nce2

After: 4...d6 5.exd6 cxd6 6.Nc3 g6 7.Be3 Bg7 8.Rc1 O-O 9.Bd3 Nc6 10.Nce2

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84C - Page 120
After: 10.Nce2
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 10...d5
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 10...d5
After 10...d5, the advance of Black's d-Pawn (10...d7-d5) serves to highlight White's error in trying to support the advance of his c-Pawn ...
  • White's d-Pawn will become Isolated,
    if White's c-Pawn captures Black's d-Pawn (11.c4xd5, then 11...Nb6xd5 or 11...Qd8xd5).

  • White's c-Pawn is not ready to be pushed to c5, just yet, with H&M-S calling it a "premature advance," if it goes now (which is exactly what White did, in the game).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 11.c5
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 11.c5
After 11.c5, White's c-Pawn becomes and Advanced Pawn and attacks Black's Nb6, but H&M-S say it's a "premature advance" of his c-Pawn (11.c4-c5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 11...Nc4 12.Bxc4 dxc4
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 11...Nc4 12.Bxc4 dxc4
After 11...Nc4 12.Bxc4 dxc4, Black chooses to force the exchange of his Nb6, for Black's light-Bishop (11...Nb6-c4 12.Bd3xc4), in response to the attack from White's c5-Pawn.

Black's d-Pawn moves into an Advanced position, onto the c-file, as it completes the trade (12...d5xc4).

As Black's d-Pawn leaves the d-file, it unleashes more pressure against White's Backward d4-Pawn, from Black's Qd8.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 13.Qd2 Bf5
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 13.Qd2 Bf5
After 13.Qd2 Bf5, White moves his Queen into Battery formation (13.Qd1-d2), with White's dark-Bishop, on the c1-h6 diagonal. It would appear White is gearing up to trying to force Black into exchanging dark-Bishops, so White can at least remove one unit of pressure against his d4-Pawn.

Black responds by developing his light-Bishop (13...Bc8-f5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84, Version 2 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2), After 14.Rxc4 Qd5 15.Ra4 Qxg2
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2),
After 14.Rxc4 Qd5 15.Ra4 Qxg2
After 14.Rxc4 Qd5 15.Ra4 Qxg2, White finally captures Black's Pawn, on c4 (14.Rc1xc4), but then Black's Queen capitalizes, moving first to d5 and forcing White's Rc4 to flee to safety (14...Qd8-d5 15.Rc4-a4); then Black's Queen takes-out White's g2-Pawn (15...Qd5xg2).

According to H&M-S, Black has a game-winning position.

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Summary of Inviting Pawn Advances (2 of 2)...

  1. Black invites White's Pawns to Advance, causing them to become Hanging Pawns (that aren't Isolated). Full details of this can be found in the Summary to No.84A & No.84B (1 of 2).

  2. Black takes advantage of White's Hanging Pawns, if White tries to capture his way out of trouble, with 5.e5xd6. Black is able to thrust his d-Pawn forward, attacking White's c4-Pawn, which will either result in White's d4-Pawn becoming Isolated, or White will be forced into a "premature advance" of his c4-Pawn. However, White also doesn't help himself (causes problems for himself) if he doesn't try to play for safety, after incurring the Hanging Pawns, and instead tries to be too ambitious: in this case, White tried to push his c-Pawn into an Advanced position, but he did it prematurely.

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PGN

[Event "PCC, p119-120 Diagram NO.84A and 84C"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1938.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Lessing"]
[Black "Denker"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "30"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. d4 {PCC, p119 Diagram NO.84A} d6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Rc1 O-O 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. Nce2 {PCC, p120 Diagram NO.84C} d5 11. c5 Nc4 12. Bxc4 dxc4 13. Qd2 Bf5 14. Rxc4 Qd5 15. Ra4 Qxg2 *

End.

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