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Hanging Pawns
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.84A to NO.84B, p119-120
Jackson v. Denker, 1935<

In this example, Black uses his King Knight to invite White to advance his e-, c- & d-Pawns (in that order) into a position where H&M-S consider them to be Hanging Pawns, despite them not being Isolated (similar to No.83).

This example reveals two different outcomes, both in Black's favor: either White loses a Pawn; or, Black will gain a Positional Advantage.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.119, No.84A, after 4.d4
  2. PCC, p.120, No.84B, after 7...Nc6
  3. Result of Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2).
  4. Summary of Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2).
  5. PGN

Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.119, No.84A, after 4.d4


Go to Example No.84C (2 of 2)

After: 1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.c4 Nb6 4.d4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84A - Page 119
After: 1.d4

1. How Black invites White's Pawns to Advance

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 1.e4 Nf6
Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 1.e4 Nf6
After 1.e4 Nf6, White begins with the common King Pawn Opening (1.e2-e4), enabling Black to make the first of his three moves with his King Knight (1...Ng8-f6), to invite White to keep advancing his Pawns.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 2.e5 Nd5
Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 2.e5 Nd5
After 2.e5 Nd5, White's e-Pawn is invited to advance further forward, by the position of Black's Nf6.

White sees an opportunity to push his e-Pawn into an Advanced position (2.e4-e5), while forcing Black to move his King Knight for a second time (2...Nf6-d5).

Note: Black could have moved his Knight to e4, but the move to d5 invites White's c-Pawn to come forward ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 3.c4 Nb6
Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 3.c4 Nb6
After 3.c4 Nb6, White's c-Pawn is invited to advance (3.c2-c4), by the unguarded position of Black's Nd5.

Black's King Knight makes its third move (3...Nd5-b6), fleeing from the attack by White's c4-Pawn, but into a position where Black's Nb6 now attacks White's c4-Pawn.

2. How White incurs Hanging Pawns (that aren't Isolated)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 4.d4
Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 4.d4
After 4.d4, White's d-Pawn is invited to advance (4.d2-d4), encouraged by the opportunity to form an Advanced Chain, with White's e5-Pawn, while joining White's c4-Pawn, in Phalanx formation, on their 4th Rank.

H&M-S say White's Pawns are Hanging Pawns (similar to No.83, they're Hanging without being Isolated), because:

H&M-S give two variations, for how Black might continue from here, and how White is affected by his Hanging Pawns:

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2)...

3. How Black takes advantage of White's Hanging Pawns, if White initially tries play his way out of trouble, without initially capturing Black's d6-Pawn

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 4...d6
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 4...d6
After 4...d6, Black's d-Pawn is developed (4...d7-d6), which attacks White's Advanced e5-Pawn, while opening the c8-h3 diagonal, for the benefit of Black's light-Bishop.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 5.Nf3 Bg4
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 5.Nf3 Bg4
After 5.Nf3 Bg4, White develops his King Knight (5.Ng1-f3), which is immediately Pinned by Black's light-Bishop (5...Bc8-g4).

Black's intention is to force an exchange of his light-Bishop, for White's Nf3, as it will remove this defender from White's d4- & e5-Pawns ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 6.h3 Bxf3 7.Qxf3
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 6.h3 Bxf3 7.Qxf3
After 6.h3 Bxf3 7.Qxf3, White's h-Pawn (6.h2-h3) tries to repel Black's Bg4, but this only serves to speed up Black's exchange of his light-Bishop, on f3 (6...Bg4xf3), with White's Queen completing the trade (7.Qd1xf3).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84 - (RESULT) Hanging Pawns, Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2), After 7...Nc6
(RESULT) Hanging Pawns,
Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2),
After 7...Nc6
After 7...Nc6, Black develops his Queen Knight (7...Nb8-c6), which increases the pressure against White's Advanced e5-Pawn, while also attacking White's d4-Pawn.

Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.120, No.84B, after 7...Nc6


Go to Example No.84C (2 of 2)

After: 4...d6 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.h3 Bxf3 7.Qxf3 Nc6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 84B - Page 120
After: 7...Nc6

4. White's Hanging Pawns will result in disadvantage, regardless of White's next choice of move

A. White loses a Pawn, if he chooses to use his Advanced e-Pawn to break the tension, by capturing Black's d6-Pawn ...

B. Black gains a Positional Advantage, if White chooses another move, as that allows Black to force an exchange of Pawns, on e5, with his Queen emerging to a commanding position, at d4 ...


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Summary of Inviting Pawn Advances (1 of 2)...

  1. Black can invite White's Pawns to Advance into Hanging Pawns (which aren't Isolated), by deliberately playing his King Knight into danger, following White's King Pawn Opening (1.e2-e4 Ng8-f6).

  2. White will incur Hanging Pawns, that aren't Isolated, if White takes the bait, and advances his e-Pawn into an Advanced position (2.e4-e5). Black will then relocate his King Knight to d5 (2...Nf6-d5), so it can invite the advance of White's c-Pawn (3.c2-c4). Black will then relocate his King Knight to b6 (3...Nd5-b6), to invite White to advance his d-Pawn to its 4th Rank (4.d2-d4), and into Phalanx formation, with White's c4-Pawn. H&M-S consider White's Pawns to be Hanging, at this moment, even though they're not Isolated from their fellow Pawns.

  3. Black takes advantage of White's Hanging Pawns, if White initially tries play his way out of trouble (by not initially capturing Black's d6-Pawn), by using his:

    • King Knight to attack White's c4-Pawn (3.c2-c4 Nd5-b6). This move has already been made, but it's worth pointing out.

    • D-Pawn to attack White's Advanced e5-Pawn (4...d7-d6).

    • Light-Bishop to trade White's King Knight off the board (5.Ng1-f3 Bc8-g4 6.h2-h3 Bg4xf3 7.Qd1xf3), thereby removing a defender of half of White's Hanging Pawns (d4) and the Advanced e5-Pawn.

    • Queen Knight to attack White's d4- & e5-Pawns (7...Nb8-c6), once the defending Kf3 has been traded off the board.


  4. White's Hanging Pawns will result in disadvantage, regardless of White's next choice of move:

    1. White will become disadvantaged (loses a Pawn), if he attempts to force an exchange of Pawns, on d6, to break the tension.

    2. White will give Black an advantage (Positional), if he refrains from doing anything with his Hanging Pawns (Black will then force the exchange of Pawns, on e5, resulting in a positional advantage, as his Queen emerges to d4).


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PGN

[Event "PCC, p119-120 Diagram NO. 84A and 84B"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1935.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jackson"]
[Black "Denker"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "14"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. d4 {PCC, p119 Diagram NO.84A} d6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 Nc6 {PCC, p120 Diagram NO.84B} *

End.

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