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Mobile Pawn Wing
The Potential Passed Pawn

Point Count Chess, NO. 50A to NO. 50B, p78

As always, the idea of having a Mobile Pawn Wing is to convert it into a subsequent advantage or benefit, once the Pawn Wing has ended.

The advantage of the Potential Passed Pawn is that it's close to becoming the REAL advantage -- the Actual Passed Pawn, whether it be a solitary Passed Pawn, an Outside Passed Pawn, or a Protected Passed Pawn.

This example looks at creating a Potential (or Actual) Passed Pawn, after the Mobile Pawn Wing has dissolved ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.78, No. 50A, before 1.b4
  2. PCC, p.78, No. 50B, after 7.Rab1
  3. End of the Mobile Pawn Wing;
  4. Result of the Mobile Pawn Wing = Potential Passed Pawn.
  5. PGN

Mobile Pawn Wing
The Potential Passed Pawn
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.78, No. 50A, Before 1.b4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A - Page 78
Before: 1.b4

First, a check that White qualifies for a Mobile Pawn Wing ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A - White's Control of the Center
Mobile Pawn Wing with:
(1 of 3) Control of the Center
Diagram 1 of 3: White has
Control of the Center, just ...


This is a tricky one to determine, as on first glance it would appear that both armies Control two squares each: White (e4,d5); Black (d4,e5). So, to me, that would spell Shared Control.

But H&M-S give White the Mobile Pawn Wing, so White must also have Control of the Center ...

This is my best reasoning, based on what I learnt from Ken Wilsdon's
7 Patterns you MUST KNOW for Control of the Center:

White Controls the Center, because you also must take into account dynamic changes in the position, since "the move on a single ply can change the evaluation of Control of that square, or the Center". Refer to Pattern #7, for Ken's explanation ...

White proves this with his very next move (1.b3-b4), which will force Black's Queen to retreat from the less-vulnerable Pawn. As we shall soon see, below (jump to 1.b4 analysis, if you can't wait), the battle for Control of e5 will come down to White's Nd3 versus Black's d6-Pawn.

At first, you might think it would be no contest, with Black controlling the square due to the greater vulnerability of White's Knight, but it's not quite as simple as that. For more, refer to Pattern #4, for Ken's explanation; while my explanation of the resulting position is with the 1.b4 analysis.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A - White's Superior Development
Mobile Pawn Wing with:
(2 of 3) Superior Development
Diagram 2 of 3: White has the
Superior Development ...


The most obvious hint that White has this one in the bag is the position of his Pawns, versus Black's Pawns ...

White has two Pawns attacking a combined total of 3 squares in enemy territory (red arrows). But Black's Pawns, by comparison, only reach squares within Black's own territory (green arrows).

Incidentally, White has a 4th v. 3rd advantage (e4 versus d6), while Black has the advantage of 2 v. 1 in the Center (d6 & e7 versus e4).

Based on Pawns alone, White has the better development, as they deny Black's Pieces the safe occupation of those three light-squares in his own territory (b5,d5,f5) ...

Of course, this assessment wouldn't be complete without looking at the development of the Pieces, as well as the Pawns, and the one thing that struck me was the difference in position between the two adverse light-square Bishops (Bc6 versus Bg2).

My first look gave Black's Bc6 the better position, as it's further advanced, than White's Bg2 (Black's Bishop is on its 3rd Rank; White's Bishop is only on its 2nd Rank) ...

However, Bishops need space along their diagonals to be effective, and that is what Black's Bc6 lacks, compared to White's Bg2. Upon closer inspection, you can see that White's Bg2 has three squares of mobility, versus Black's Bc6, which only has one square it can safely move to (yellow arrows). I have to say that White's Bishop has the better position.

As the other Pieces have similar development qualities (e.g. both adverse Knights are on their 3rd Ranks; both adverse Rooks are Connected; both Kings have Castled Kingside), White has the Superior Development.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A - White's Mobile Pawn Wing (Queenside)
Mobile Pawn Wing with:
(3 of 3) White's Queenside Pawns
Diagram 3 of 3: White has
a Mobile Pawn Wing, on the Queenside Flank ...


Here, we see the Queenside Pawn Wing chosen by White, and it's in an identical starting position to the example of Expansion on "General Principles" that resulted in White gaining an Actual Passed Pawn.

This ties in neatly with this current example that eventually results in a Potential Passed Pawn (one step before the Actual version).

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.78, No. 50B, After 7.Rab1

After: 1.b4 Qb6 2.Nd5 Bxd5 3.exd5 Nf8 4.c5 dxc5 5.bxc5 Qd8 6.Bxf6 Bxf6 7.Rab1

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - Page 78
After 7.Rab1

The next image completes the Control of the Center analysis (before 1.b4), which helped to determine that White qualified for the Mobile Pawn Wing.

White's Mobile Pawn Wing begins to advance at the same time as taking Control of the Center ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 1...Qb6
Nobody Controls e5!
After: 1.b4 Qb6
This is my reason why I believe Black's d6-Pawn no longer helps to Control the e5-square, which gives White Control of the Center...

At first sight, it would appear that Black would Control this square, because a Knight (Nd3) is more vulnerable against a Pawn (d6-Pawn), and that would make it another Pattern #2 ...

BUT, you must also remember to factor in "who will move to the square", to determine Control. After the relocation of his Queen (1...Qa5-b6), Black has nothing to move to d5, so CANNOT claim to have Control over it. Compare the difference between this and the successful attempt by White to Control d5, and you'll see that White has Pieces that CAN move to d5, even though his Pawns (c4 & e4) cannot, as yet, move there themselves. Refer to Pattern #4, for Ken's explanation.

Next, a Combination by White leads to the Potential Passed Pawn. Before we see that final position (the Result), it's not a bad idea to see the component parts of the Combination, broken down (this also includes the End of the Mobile Pawn Wing) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 2.Nd5
White's Combination (1 of 6)
After 2.Nd5
White's Combination (1 of 6) ...

White attacks with the only Piece available to kickstart the whole combination.

Leading with 2.Nc3-d5, White forces Black to capture his Nd5 or lose a Piece (Qb6 or Nf6), with this Relative Knight Fork.

The position of White's Pawns, at c4 and e4 respectively, means that Black will lose material.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 3.exd5
White's Combination (2 of 6)
After 2...Bxd5 3.exd5
White's Combination (2 of 6) ...

Black chose to trade what was a bit of a Bad Bishop (2...Bc6xd5) for White's Nd5.

The benefit of White's e4-Pawn clearing-up the trade (3.exd5) is it creates a 4-v-3 Pawn Majority for White on the Queenside, since Black's c-Pawn is missing.

White has also gain an Advanced Chain (c4.d5), from this maneuver.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 3.c5
White's Combination (3 of 6)
After 3...Nf8 4.c5
White's Combination (3 of 6) ...

Black's Ne6 flees from the attack by White's d5-Pawn, relocating all the way back up to Black's Back Rank (3...Ne6-f8). This enables White to move another Pawn from the Mobile Pawn Wing (4.c5) ...

White dissolves his previous Advanced Chain and creates another (b4,c5), attacking both Black's Qb6 & d6-Pawn, in the process.

The next part of the Combination sequence results in the end of White's Mobile Pawn Wing ...


[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The End of White's Mobile Pawn Wing ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 4...dxc5 - Mobile Pawn Wing Ends
White's Combination (4 of 6)
End of the Mobile Pawn Wing
After 4...dxc5
White's Combination (4 of 6) ...

White's Pawn Wing ends as the last moves of his Combination are completed.

In the diagram (left), we can see that it is Black who ends White's Mobile Pawn Wing, after capturing White's c-Pawn (4...dxc5).

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of White's Mobile Pawn Wing
is a Potential Passed Pawn...

White's Potential Passed Pawn isn't ready to be heralded just yet, as we need to see the final few moves of White's Combination play, which creates the desired result ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 5.bxc5
White's Combination (5 of 6)
After 5.bxc5
White's Combination (5 of 6) ...

The next move from White attacks Black's Qb6, while sliding into position on the 5th rank (5.bxc5), next to the friendly Pawn on d5.

The outcome is White now has two Advanced Pawns on his 5th Rank.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50B - After 7.Rab1
White's Combination (6 of 6)
After 5...Qd8 6.Bxf6 Bxf6 7.Rab1
White's Combination (6 of 6) ...

White's Combination comes to an end after a short flurry of activity:
  1. (5...Qb6-d8) Black's Queen flees from the attack by White's c5-Pawn;
  2. (6.Bb2xf6 Bg7xf6) White trades his dark Bishop for Black's Nf6, which is completed by Black's dark Bishop ;
  3. (7.Rab1) White's Rook escapes the attack by Black's Bf6.

At last, we can see the fruits of White's labor, and analyze the position that contains his Potential Passed Pawn. As per usual, in the process of comparing the result, I like to look at where the Pawns & Pieces started out and the position they were in when the Mobile Pawn Wing finished ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing Start, After 1...Qb6 - No Highlights
(START) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 1...Qb6
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing Start, After 1...Qb6
(START) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 1...Qb6
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing Pre-End, After 4.c5 - No Highlights
(PRE-END) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 4.c5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing Pre-End, After 4.c5
(PRE-END) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 4.c5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing End, After 4...dxc5 - No Highlights
(END) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 4...dxc5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Mobile Pawn Wing End, After 4...dxc5
(END) Mobile Pawn Wing,
After 4...dxc5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Potential Passed Pawn, After 7.Rab1 - No Highlights
(RESULT) Potential Passed Pawn,
After: 7.Rab1
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - Result, Potential Passed Pawn, After 7.Rab1
(RESULT) Potential Passed Pawn,
After: 7.Rab1

Black's b7-Pawn is the weakness (a Backward Pawn) that gives White a Potential Passed Pawn that threatens to become an Actual Passed Pawn.

You can see that White's two Minor Pieces (Nd3 & Bg2) defend the two 5th Rank Pawns against the threat from Black's more valuable Major Pieces (Rc8 & Qd8). This is what prevents White's Pawns from being a liability -- they would otherwise be a Hanging Phalanx.

White's Actual Passed Pawn could come from either of the following scenarios (not limited to these moves; just a selection, as an example) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - White gains an Actual Passed Pawn - Theoretical Sequence 1
White gains Actual Passed Pawn
(Theoretical Sequence #1)
After: 7...b6 8.c6
White's Actual Passed Pawn
Theoretical Sequence #1 ...


If Black's Backward b7-Pawn were to try and attack White's c5-Pawn, White's Pawn can simply step up into a Protected Passed Pawn structure, and will be protected by the d5-Pawn, which in turn would be defended by Bg2, against the threat from Black's Qd8.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - White gains an Actual Passed Pawn - Theoretical Sequence 2
White gains Actual Passed Pawn
(Theoretical Sequence #2)
After: 7...b5 8.c6
White's Actual Passed Pawn
Theoretical Sequence #2 ...


If Black's Backward b7-Pawn were to move out to b5, to remove its Backwardness, White's Pawn would become a Passed Pawn, instantly, as Black's b-Pawn would have been the last of Pawn defenders that could deny White's Potential Passed Pawn from becoming an Actual Passer.

As seen in the diagram (left), once again, White could turn his c-Pawn into a Protected Passed Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 50A to 50B - White gains an Actual Passed Pawn - Theoretical Sequence 3
White gains Actual Passed Pawn
(Theoretical Sequence #3)
After: 7...e6 8.c6 exd5 9.cxb7
White's Actual Passed Pawn
Theoretical Sequence #3 ...


Black might choose to attack White's d5-Pawn (7...e7-e6), instead. But this would allow White to focus on creating an Advanced Chain out of the c-Pawn (8.c5-c6).

From here, if Black were to capture the Base Pawn of the Advanced Chain (8...exd5), White would be able to capture Black's Backward b7-Pawn (9.cxb7) ...

(Still looking at Theoretical Sequence #3) White's b7-Pawn would have become an Actual Passed Pawn, supported by White's Rb1.

White's b7-Pawn would be one move away from gaining Promotion, either by b7-b8 or, if Black didn't respond to the threat to his Rook, by b7xc8 (claiming Black's Rc8 in the process).


[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

PGN

[Event "PCC, p78 Diagram NO. 50A and 50B"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1955.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Blau"]
[Black "Golombek"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2r1r1k1/1p2ppbp/p1bpnnp1/q7/2P1P3/1PNN2PP/PB1Q1PB1/R2R2K1 w - - 0 0"]
[PlyCount "13"]

{PCC, p78 Diagram NO. 50A} 1. b4 Qb6 2. Nd5 Bxd5 3. exd5 Nf8 4. c5 dxc5 5. bxc5 Qd8 6. Bxf6 Bxf6 7. Rab1 {PCC, p78 Diagram NO. 50B} *

End.

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