« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples

The Advanced Pawn
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.34, p56
Euwe v. Bogoljubov, 1928

In this example, White's d-Pawn becomes the Pawn at K5 (e5) by Capture, when it completes an exchange of Knights, on e5, initiated by White and his King Knight.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.56, No.34, after 11.Ne5
  2. Result of the Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2).
  3. Summary of the Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2).
  4. PGN

The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.56, No.34, after 11.Ne5

After: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 O-O 7.Rc1 c6 8.Bd3 a6 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.O-O b5 11.Ne5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - Page 56
After: 11.Ne5

1. The Development Phase: White gets his troops into position.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 1.d4 to 3...d5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 1.d4 to 3...d5
After 1.d4 to 3...d5, White's d-Pawn (1.d2-d4) is in position, ready to become the P-K5 (e5) by Capture.

White's c-Pawn will be sacrificed, as part of a Pawn exchange on d5, which will remove the Pawn threat coming from the c-file ...

Black's c-Pawn will complete the exchange, but become stuck on d5, unable to advance due to White's Queen Knight, which will be posted at d4.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 4.Bg5 and 5.e3
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 4.Bg5 » 5.e3
After 4.Bg5 » 5.e3, before advancing his e-Pawn, to give support to the d4-Pawn, White makes sure to get his light-Bishop out (4.Bc1-g5), to apply the Pin against Black's Nf6.

Once done, White's e-Pawn is marched forwards (5.e2-e3). If this had happened first, White would have restricted the development of his light-Bishop, harming White's game plan.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 7.Rc1 c6
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 7.Rc1 c6
After 7.Rc1 c6, White's plan is to trade his c-Pawn to bring Black's c-Pawn onto the d-file, at d5. This will also result in the c-file becoming fully Open, therefore, White prepares for this, bringing his Queen Rook to the base of the c-file (7.Ra1-c1), ready to Control it, when the file becomes Open.

Black's c-Pawn is advanced (7...c7-c6), in anticipation of the Pawn exchange, on d5.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 8.Bd3 a6
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 8.Bd3 a6
After 8.Bd3 a6, the game has reached a point where White feels ready to unleash his attack, which will result in him exchanging his c-Pawn and getting his d-Pawn to K5 (e5) by Capture.

2. White clears the c-file, with a Pawn Exchange

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 9.cxd5 cxd5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 9.cxd5 cxd5
After 9.cxd5 cxd5, White's c-Pawn captures Black's d-Pawn (9.c4xd5), which compels Black's c-Pawn to complete this exchange of Pawns (9...c6xd5).

Despite White's Nc3 being in the way, White's Rc1 now sits on the fully Open c-file.

Eventually, after his d-Pawn goes to K5 (e5), White's Nc3 will be relocated, via e2, to sit safely on d4 (see the Result, after 15.Nd4).

3. White exchanges Nf3, to get his d-Pawn to K5 (e5) by Capture

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 10.O-O
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 10.O-O
After 10.O-O, just before the Knight exchange takes place, White first Castles his King to safety, on the Kingside (10.O-O).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 11.Ne5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 11.Ne5
After 11.Ne5, White initiates the exchange of Knights, with his King Knight (11.Nf3-e5).
It's at this point, after 11.Nf3-e5, that H&M-S raise the matter of Black's Dilemma:

To capture White's Outpost Ne5 (11...Nd7xe5) will allow White to replace the Knight with his d-Pawn (12.d4xd5). Black must ask himself whether a Pawn at K5 (e5) will be more trouble than if he were to let White keep his Knight on the e5-Outpost.

In the game, Black chose to capture White's Ne5 ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 11...Nxe5 12.dxe5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 11...Nxe5 12.dxe5
After 11...Nxe5 12.dxe5, Black enters into the Knight exchange (11...Nd7xe5), allowing White's d-Pawn to become the Pawn at K5 by Capture, when it completes the trade (12.d4xe5).

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of the Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 12.dxe5 Nd7
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 12.dxe5 Nd7
After 12.dxe5 Nd7, White's newly-gained P-K5 (e5) forces Black's Nf6 to flee (12...Nf6-d7).

White has gained Doubled Pawns on the e-file (e3, e5). Given that White went on to win the game, this can be considered one of those times when Doubled Pawns is acceptable.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 13.Bf4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 13.Bf4
After 13.Bf4, White's dark-Bishop appears important to his plans, as he decides to withdraw it to safety (13.Bg5-f4), rather than exchange it with Black's dark-Bishop (Be7).

White's Bf4 serves to provide support for the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5), so this could actually be the reason White chose not to trade dark-Bishops.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), After 14.Ne2 and 15.Nd4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2),
After 14.Ne2 » 15.Nd4
After 14.Ne2 » 15.Nd4, White relocates his Queen Knight, from c3, via e2, to occupy the Fourth Rank Outpost, at d4 (14.Nc3-e2 » 15.Ne2-d4).

Notice that White's Nd4 is virtually immune from attack, since Black's e-Pawn blockaded by White's Pawn at K5 (e5), and due to the absence of Black's c-Pawn, after White having earlier played to exchange c-Pawns onto d5.

H&M-S say: "The displacement of White's queen pawn has been a boon to him by giving him an "eternal square" for his knight."

Finally, as mentioned earlier, you can see how White's Queen Rook (Rc1) has been left Controlling the Open c-file.

The example ends here, as H&M-S say: "Black has a miserable game." And it all escalated with Black deciding to capture White's Ne5, following his Dilemma. This could have been avoided, had he followed H&M-S's two-point solution ...

H&M-S's Two-point Solution, to solve
Black's Dilemma re: White's Outpost Ne5.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma 1, After 11.Ne5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma, After 11.Ne5
Black's Dilemma:

To capture White's Outpost Ne5 (11...Nd7xe5) will allow White to replace the Knight with his d-Pawn (12.d4xd5).

Black must ask himself whether White's Pawn at K5 (e5) will be more trouble than if he were to let White keep his Knight on the e5-Outpost.

H&M-S offer a two-point solution, to help Black settle his Dilemma:

1. Black must assess the current state of development.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma 2, After 11.Ne5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma, After 11.Ne5
Question: Can White support the Ne5 with his f-Pawn (f2-f4), and then follow it up with a "regulation king-side pawn storm"?

Answer: (After 11.Nf3-e5) With White's King Knight having vacated the f3 square, White's f-Pawn could indeed be pushed out to support the newly landed Ne5 (f2-f4).

Following that, as seen in No.31 (after 12.f4xe5 » 13.h2-h4), White can begin his "regulation Kingside Pawn Storm," with the advance of his h-Pawn.

This alone should have made Black avoid capturing White's Ne5, had Black been aware of H&M-S's assessment of White's development.

2. Black must decide whether he will gain an advantage, or be at a disadvantage after ...Nd7xe5 » ...f7-f6.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - The Advanced Pawn, The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma 3, After 11.Ne5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2), Black's Dilemma, After 11.Ne5
If Black decides to capture the Knight (...Nd7xe5), followed up by an attack with his f-Pawn (...f7-f6) to remove White's e5-Pawn (after the d-Pawn to K5 by capture) ...
  • Will Black gain an advantage due to the opening of the f-file (considering the position of his Rf8)

  • Or, will Black find himself at a disadvantage, through having weakened the Pawn Guard surrounding his King?
I wasn't sure about this, so I got Fritz 12 to make the moves, and eventually, White was able to break through the Half-open f-file, with his Queen, which left Black's exposed King in all sorts of trouble:

So, to conclude the second point ... It appears that, if Black does decide to capture White's Ne5, he certainly shouldn't then seek to deploy his f-Pawn, to attack the resulting White Pawn at K5 (e5).

To be fair, in the game, Black (Bogoljubov) didn't make this mistake (playing 13...Bb7, instead). However, by this time, he had already made, what would appear to have been the initial error, of capturing White's Ne5, when it was evident White could advance his f-Pawn, and then carry out a "regulation king-side pawn storm."


[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

Summary of the Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)...

  1. White gets his c- & d-Pawns out to the front line, immediately. White begins the game with 1.d2-d4 and, after Black's 1...Ng8-f6, he follows it with 2.c2-c4.

  2. White clears the c-file, with a Pawn Exchange, (9.c4xd5 c6xd5). Prior to this, White prepares for the Open c-file, by developing his Queen Rook to c1 (7.Ra1-c1).

  3. White exchanges his King Knight (Nf3), to get his d-Pawn to K5 (e5) by Capture. The move, Nf3-e5, posts White's King Knight onto the e5-Outpost, causing Black's Dilemma: is White's Ne5, or e5-Pawn by Capture (d4xe5) more or less favorable to Black? ... Due to White's ability to develop his f-Pawn to f4, H&M-S suggest that Black made a mistake by capturing White's Ne5 (11...Nd7xe5).

  4. White's d-Pawn becomes the Pawn at K5 (e5) by Capture, when it completes the Knight exchange (12.d4xe5). This also gives White Doubled Pawns on the e-file, although they appear to be acceptable, in this specific situation.

  5. White's Queen Knight (Nc3) is relocated to the "eternal square" (d4), via e2 (14.Nc3-e2 » 15.Ne2-d4), to become a Fourth Rank Outpost. H&M-S appear to call d4 an "eternal square," because it cannot be challenged by a Black Pawn -- Black's c-Pawn is now on the d-file, so cannot attack (it's path is being blockaded by White's Nd4); and Black's e-Pawn is being blockaded by White's Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5), so it also cannot get at the d4-square, to attack White's Nd4.

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

PGN

[Event "Utrecht (Netherlands)"]
[Site "It"]
[Date "1928"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Max Euwe"]
[Black "Efim Bogoljubov"]
[ECO "D66"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 O-O 7.Rc1 c6 8.Bd3 a6 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.O-O b5 11.Ne5 {PCC p.56 No.34} Nxe5 12.dxe5 Nd7 13.Bf4 Bb7 14.Ne2 Qb8 15.Nd4 g6 16.Bh6 Rc8 17.Rxc8+ Qxc8 18.f4 Nc5 19.g4 Nxd3 20.Qxd3 Qc4 21.Qd2 Bb4 22.Qf2 Qd3 23.f5 Qe4 24.Qg3 exf5 25.gxf5 Bf8 26.Bxf8 Rxf8 27.f6 h5 28.Qg5 Qg4+ 29.Qxg4 hxg4 30.e6 Kh7 31.e7 Re8 32.Rc1 Kh6 33.Ne6 1-0

End.

« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples