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The Advanced Pawn
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.32, p53
Zukertort v. Blackburne, 1883

In this example, in contrast with No.31, White's e-Pawn is the one that gets pushed into the Advanced position at K5 (e5), to chase away Black's Nf6.

I've noted the moment briefly, but my main focus was to compare why or when White may choose to use his f-Pawn versus his e-Pawn (and vice versa), to carry out the Knight chasing task ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.53, No.32, after 17...Rc7
  2. Result of the P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2).
  3. PGN
Additional analysis includes the:

P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.53, No.32, after 17...Rc7

After: 1.c4 e6 2.e3 Nf6 3.Nf3 b6 4.Be2 Bb7 5.O-O d5 6.d4 Bd6 7.Nc3 O-O 8.b3 Nbd7 9.Bb2 Qe7 10.Nb5 Ne4 11.Nxd6 cxd6 12.Nd2 Ndf6 13.f3 Nxd2 14.Qxd2 dxc4 15.Bxc4 d5 16.Bd3 Rfc8 17.Rae1 Rc7

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - Page 53
After: 17...Rc7
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - The Advanced Pawn, P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2), After 17.Rae1
The Advanced Pawn,
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight
(2 of 2), After 17.Rae1
After 17.Rae1, White brings his Queen Rook to the e-file, ready to support the push of the e-Pawn, up to e5, so it can chase away Black's Nf6.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - The Advanced Pawn, P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2), After 18.e4 and 19.e5 Ne8
The Advanced Pawn,
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight
(2 of 2), After 18.e4 » 19.e5 Ne8
After 18.e4 » 19.e5 Ne8, White's e-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5) ...

White's e-Pawn is pushed to e4 (18.e3-e4) and then on again, onto e5 (19.e4-e5), whereupon its attack towards the f6-square chases away Black's King Knight, (19...Nf6-e8). This removes one of the most effective defenders of Black's Kingside Castled King.

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The Result of the P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - The Advanced Pawn, P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2), After 20.f4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight
(2 of 2), After 20.f4
After 20.f4, with Black's Knight no longer adequately defending its King, from f6, White is clear to ramp up his assault against Black's Kingside Pawn Guards.

With the Rf1 having been in position on the f-file, ever since White Castled Kingside (5.O-O), White begins his assault with the advance of his f-Pawn (20.f2-f4).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - The Advanced Pawn, P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2), After 23.f4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight
(2 of 2), After 23.f4
After 23.f4, H&M-S reveal that White (Zukertort), subsequently unleashed what they called his "immortal combination", beginning with 23.f4-f5, which takes-out both Black's g- & h-Pawns (25.f5xg6 » 26.g6xh7+), to leave White's Rf1, still sitting on the f-file, but now Controlling the Useful Open File.

White went on to win the game.

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Comparison between No.31 vs. No.32;
White's e-Pawn vs. the f-Pawn as the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5)...

In No.31, White's f-Pawn became the Advanced e5-Pawn and chased away Black's Nf6. Here, in No.32, White does the job with his e-Pawn.

So, what are the conditions that suit using the e-Pawn, versus those that suit the f-Pawn, as Advanced Black Knight chasers?

In No.31 after 12.f4xe5 (below-left), White's f-Pawn completes the Pawn exchange (12.f4xe5), becoming the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5) and chases away Black's Nf6 (12...Nf6-d7). Earlier, after 10.e4-e5, White's e-Pawn did get pushed into the Advanced position, but Black's d6-Pawn is in position to capture it. However, that enabled White to bring his f-Pawn across onto the e5-square.

Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.32 -- Diagram 31
(COMPARISON) P-K5 (e5) to
Chase the King Knight (Nf6),
No.31, After 12.fxe5
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.32 -- Diagram 32
(COMPARISON) P-K5 (e5) to
Chase the King Knight (Nf6),
No.32, After 19.e5

Here, in No.32 after 19.e4-e5 (above-right), White's e-Pawn is pushed straight up into the Advanced position, itself chasing away Black's Nf6 (19...Nf6-e8).

Let's look at the position just before each Pawn is pushed up to K5 (e5) ...

In No.31 (after 9...a6, below-left), Black has a 2-v-1 Center Pawn advantage, as White's d-Pawn is no longer on the board. White gets around this problem with his f-Pawn, which has just been brought up to the front line (9.f2-f4).

White's plan is to trade off his remaining Center Pawn (e4), to remove one of the two Black Center Pawns. This is achieved by pushing his e-Pawn up to e5, attacking Black's precious Nf6, and forcing Black's d-Pawn to capture (10...d6xe5). This brings Black's former d-Pawn within range of White's f-Pawn, which can then come across onto e5, by way of capture (12.f4xe5) -- the move is delayed, to ensure Black's Nc6 cannot become a nuisance (11.Nd4xc6) -- and Black's Nf6 is forced to flee (12...Nf6-d7).

Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.32 -- Diagram 31
(COMPARISON) P-K5 (e5) to
Chase the King Knight (Nf6),
No.31, After 9...a6
Point Count Chess - IE - Comparison, No.32 -- Diagram 32
(COMPARISON) P-K5 (e5) to
Chase the King Knight (Nf6),
No.32, After 18...Rac8

In No.32 (after 18...Rac8, above-right), both sides still have their pair of Center Pawns. The d-Pawns are fixed on their respective Q4 squares (d4/d5 respectively).

The key difference is what enables White to push his e-Pawn up to e5, without it being captured by Black's d5-Pawn. First, White has a 3:2 majority defending the e-Pawn (Bd3, Re1 & the f3-Pawn), versus Black's d5-Pawn & Nf6. But it's White's f-Pawn that appears to keep White's e-Pawn safe from Black's d4-Pawn -- it's not worth it for Black to make the capture (...d5xe4), as it would enable White's f-Pawn to replace it (f3xe4), and that would give White the countable advantage of 2-v-1 in the Center, plus White would still be able to push his replacement e-Pawn up to e5, gaining the Advanced Pawn, and still forcing Black's Nf6 to flee, anyway.


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PGN

[Event "Tnmt, London"]
[Site "Tnmt, London"]
[Date "1883?"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Johannes Zukertort"]
[Black "Joseph Henry Blackburne"]
[ECO "A13"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1. c4 e6 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 b6 4. Be2 Bb7 5. O-O d5 6. d4 Bd6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. b3 Nbd7 9. Bb2 Qe7 10. Nb5 Ne4 11. Nxd6 cxd6 12. Nd2 Ndf6 13. f3 Nxd2 14. Qxd2 dxc4 15. Bxc4 d5 16. Bd3 Rfc8 17. Rae1 Rc7 {PCC p.53 No.32} 18. e4 Rac8 19. e5 Ne8 20. f4 g6 21. Re3 f5 22. exf6 Nxf6 23. f5 Ne4 24. Bxe4 dxe4 25. fxg6 Rc2 26. gxh7+ Kh8 27. d5+ e5 28. Qb4 R8c5 29. Rf8+ Kxh7 30. Qxe4+ Kg7 31. Bxe5+ Kxf8 32. Bg7+ Kg8 33. Qxe7 1-0

End.

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