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The Advanced Pawn
Securing an Outpost Station

Point Count Chess, NO.30, p51
Gruenfeld v. Lokvenc, 1926

This example focuses on White expanding his e-Pawn into an Advanced postion (e5), where it is tasked with securing the d6-square as White's Outpost Station.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.51, No.30, before 1.e5
  2. Result of Securing an Outpost Station.
  3. Summary of Securing an Outpost Station.
  4. PGN

Securing an Outpost Station
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.51, No.30, before 1.e5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 30 - Page 51
Before: 1.e5

Prior to 1.e4-e5, note the position of Black's c- & e-Pawns: they have advanced out of range for defending the d6-square, turning it into a Hole, which in turn becomes White's Sixth Rank Outpost, after 1.e4-e5.

1. White's e-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn, tasked with securing the d6-Outpost Station

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 30 - The Advanced Pawn, Securing an Outpost Station, After 1.e5 Nd5
The Advanced Pawn,
Securing an Outpost Station,
After 1.e5 Nd5
After 1.e5 Nd5, White's e-Pawn becomes an Advanced Pawn (1...e4-e5), forming the head of an Advanced Chain (d4,e5).

Black is forced to relocate his attacked Nf6, sending it to occupy the Fourth Rank Outpost, d5 (1...Nf6-d5).

White's d-Pawn contests Control of the "important" Q6 (f6) square, which H&M-S suggest is vital for White to nail down.

In the other direction, it appears the d6-square, without any Black Pawns to attack/defend it, is White's intended Sixth Rank Outpost, secured already by White's Advanced e5-Pawn.

I guess White chooses not to trade light-Bishop for the Knight, as it will leave Black with a Pawn in the Center.

As things stand, according to H&M-S, despite White's d-Pawn being Backward and his e-Pawn having left the d5-square unguarded (hence Black's ...Nf6-d5), White is "already entitled to count a point (claim the advantage) for full Control of the Center."

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The Result of Securing an Outpost Station...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 30 - The Advanced Pawn, Securing an Outpost Station, After 2.Ne4 to 4.Nd6
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Securing an Outpost Station,
After 2.Ne4 to 4.Nd6
After 2.Ne4 to 4.Nd6, White sends a Knight straight up to occupy the d6-Outpost (2.Ng3-e4 » 4.Ne4-d6).

Note: in the middle of sending his Knight up to the d6-Outpost, White takes time to ensure either of Black's Knights cannot cause trouble from the f4-square. White advances his g-Pawn (3.g2-g3), to keep them out of f4.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 30 - The Advanced Pawn, Securing an Outpost Station, After 4...Nb6 to 6.Ne4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Securing an Outpost Station,
After 4...Nb6 to 6.Ne4
After 4...Nb6 to 6.Ne4, Black relocates his Outpost Knight, sending it back up to his back rank (4...Nd5-b6 » 5...Nb6-c8), to force White to remove his Knight from his d6-Outpost (6.Nd6-e4).

But that's all it does, as White's Advanced e5-Pawn is still in position, securing the d6-Outpost (and potentially the f6-square as another Outpost), for the time when it's safe for the return of a White Knight.
H&M-S suggest White turns his focus to advancing his Kingside Pawns, marching them up to force Black's Ng6 to flee, and then break through to Black's King. They say:

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Summary of Securing an Outpost Station...

  1. White's e-Pawn is pushed into the Advanced Position (1.e4-e5), where it forces Black's Nf6 to flee (1...Nf6-d5).

  2. White's Advanced e5-Pawn contests Control of the "vital" f6-square, while claiming full Control of the d6-square.

  3. The d6-square becomes White's Outpost Station, secured by his Advanced e5-Pawn, since there are no Black Pawns on the adjacent squares to contest Control of the d6-square (both c- & e-Pawns have move out of defensive range).

  4. White attempts to occupy the d6-Outpost with a Knight (2.Ng3-e4 » 4.Ne4-d6), but it gets chased away (4...Nd5-b6 » 5...Nb6-c8 6.Nd6-e4), for the time being. So, H&M-S suggest White turns his attention to attacking Black's Kingside Stronghold, by marching his h-Pawn, then his f-Pawn, up the board, first forcing Black's Ng6 to flee (h-Pawn to attack at h5); second, to break open the Pawn Guard surrounding Black's Castled King (f-Pawn to attack either the f-Pawn, via capture of Black's e6-Pawn, or it'll go straight up to attack Black's g7-Pawn, from f6).

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PGN

[Event "PCC, p51 Diagram NO.30"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1926"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Gruenfeld"]
[Black "Lokvenc"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2rr2k1/pp1bqppp/2p1pnn1/8/2BPP3/5NN1/PP2QPPP/2RR2K1 w - - 0 0"]
[PlyCount "11"]

{PCC, p51 Diagram NO.30} 1. e5 Nd5 2. Ne4 Rc7 3. g3 Be8 4. Nd6 Nb6 5. Bb3 Nc8 6. Ne4 *

End.

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