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The Advanced Pawn
Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)

Point Count Chess, NO.28C, p50
Heinicke v. Stahlberg, 1955

This example continues on from No.28A, and is a variation on H&M-S's example No.28B. So, once again, we see the disadvantage to Black, after having created his "dubious" Advanced d-Pawn ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.50, No.28C, after 11.Rb1
  2. Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3).
  3. Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3).
  4. PGN

Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.50, No.28C, after 11.Rb1

After: 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5 3.Nf3 d4 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.O-O e5 6.d3 a5 7.e3 Be7 8.exd4 exd4 9.Na3 Bxa3 10.bxa3 Nge7 11.Rb1

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - Page 50
After: 11.Rb1

1. Black's d-Pawn becomes the "dubious" Advanced Pawn, in the English Opening

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 1.c4 to 6.d3
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 1.c4 to 6.d3
After 1.c4 to 6.d3, these first half-dozen moves are the same as those featured in No.28A & No.28B, as Black gains his "dubious" Advanced Pawn at Q5 (3...d5-d4).

White continues to develop efficiently (developing one new unit with each successive turn), while Black takes multiple moves of his e-Pawn (1...e7-e6 » 5...e6-e5), to secure the d-Pawn, but loses a Tempo in doing so.

The remainder of the sequence is a variation to the moves H&M-S in No.28B.

2. Black's No.28C Variation prevents White's b-Pawn moving to b4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 6...a5
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 6...a5
After 6...a5, Black's a-Pawn advance (6...a7-a5) prevents White from developing his b-Pawn to b4, as was the case in No.28B (7.b2-b4)*
* H&M-S had stated that Black couldn't allow White to advance his b-Pawn (e.g. 8.b4-b5) to become a dangerous Advanced Pawn, and the lead Pawn in what would be an Advanced Chain (d3,c4,b5) ...

And so, H&M-S's example (in No.28B) showed how Black was compelled to capture the b-Pawn with his dark-Bishop (7...Bg8xb4). Of course, that enabled White's Queen to capture the undefended Black Bishop (9.Qd1-a4+ » 10.Qa4xb4). Therefore, Black's 6...a7-a5, in No.28C, is a fairly reasonable response.

3. Black's No.28C Variation still loses the e-Pawn

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 7.e3 to 8...exd4
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 7.e3 to 8...exd4
After 7.e3 to 8...exd4, White trades e-Pawns on d4, removing Black's original Advanced Pawn, only for it to be replaced by the avenging e5-Pawn (7.e2-e3 » 8.e3xd4 e5xd4).

While the outcome ensures Black retains the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4), the effect is the loss of the Pawn from the e-file. It happened a little differently in No.28B, but the result is the same: Black's d4-Pawn loses e-Pawn support, and the e-file becomes fully Open.

4. Black's No.28C Variation still loses the dark-Bishop

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 9.Na3 to 10.bxa3
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 9.Na3 to 10.bxa3
After 9.Na3 to 10.bxa3, White settles for having a Doubled Isolated Pawn on the a-file, in return for exchanging his Queen Knight for Black's dark-Bishop (9.Nb1-a3 Be7xa3 10.bxa3).
It would appear, having looked at both variations (No.28B & No.28C), that White needs to take-out Black's dark-Bishop, for the sake of his overall strategy:
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 11.Rb1
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 11.Rb1
After 11.Rb1, White installs his Queen Rook onto the Half-open b-file.

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The Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)), After 11.Rb1
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(3 of 3), After 11.Rb1
After 11.Rb1, the result of Black's desire to gain his Advanced d-Pawn so early in the English Opening (1.c4) is a Cramped Position on the Queenside (further development there is now fairly awkward).

While White had to accept his Weak Pawn structure on the Queenside (the Doubled Isolated Pawn), H&M-S seem prefer the advantages in White's favor: the Bishop-pair and the Half-open b-file.

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Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)...

  1. Although already mentioned in No.28A & No.28B, it's worth repeating that H&M-S consider Black's choice to gain his Advanced d-Pawn (3...d5-d4) a "dubious" decision, since it requires Black to spend multiple moves of the same units (the d- & e-Pawns, respectively), which enables White to march into a two Tempi lead, in the Opening phase, where time spent developing your army is a critical factor and, where possible, shouldn't be wasted.

  2. Black's variation, from No.28B, begins when he brings out his a-Pawn (6...a7-a5), to prevent White from developing his b-Pawn to b4, which threatens to go onto b5 (becoming a danger to Black's Queenside) and would otherwise require Black to capture it with his dark-Bishop, which eventually leads to the loss of the Bishop, to White's Queen (again, see No.28B, after 9.Qd1-a4+).

  3. White compels Black to exchange e-Pawns (7.e2-e3 » 8.e3xd4 e5xd4). Black still maintains his Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4), but it no longer has support from the e-Pawn -- same as in No.28B, albeit a different way White went about achieving this result.

  4. In a variation from No.28B, White appears intent on removing Black's dark-Bishop from the game, preferring to trade his Queen Knight and take on a Doubled Isolated Pawn structure, on the a-file. White obviously believes Black's dark-Bishop to be a major threat to his game plan. In any case, H&M-S say White's weak Pawn structure is a small price to pay.

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PGN

[Event "PCC, p50 Diagram NO.28C"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1955"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Heinicke"]
[Black "Stahlberg"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "21"]

1. c4 e6 2. g3 d5 3. Nf3 d4 4. Bg2 Nc6 5. O-O e5 6. d3 a5 7. e3 Be7 8. exd4 exd4 9. Na3 Bxa3 10. bxa3 Nge7 11. Rb1 {PCC, p50 Diagram NO.28C} *

End.

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