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The Advanced Pawn
Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)

Point Count Chess, NO.28B, p49
Example Sequence

This example continues on from No.28A, as the extent of Black's "dubious" Advanced d-Pawn is revealed ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.49, No.28B, after 6.d3
  2. Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3).
  3. Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3).
  4. PGN

Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.49, No.28B, after 6.d3

After: 1.c4 e6 2.g3 d5 3.Nf3 d4 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.O-O e5 6.d3

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - Page 49
After: 6.d3

1. Black's d-Pawn becomes the "dubious" Advanced Pawn, in the English Opening

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 1.c4 to 3...d4
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 1.c4 to 3...d4
After 1.c4 to 3...d4, Black gains the "dubious" Advanced Pawn at Q5 (3...d5-d4).

These opening three moves are the same as in No.28A. Now come the continuation moves, in H&M-S's example (No.28B) ...

2. White's continued development exposes Black's loss of Tempo

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3), After 4.Bg2 to 6...Nf6
The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 4.Bg2 to 6...Nf6
After 4.Bg2 to 6...Nf6, White has built his House, or Stronghold, for the protection of his Kingside Castled King. In the process, White has developed a further three Pieces: the Fianchetto of the Bishop (4.Bf1-g2), which enables the single, fluid developing move of the King and Rook during Castling (5.O-O).

Black has only developed his two Knights (4...Nb8-c6 & 6...Ng8-f6). His other move merely expanded and already developed unit (5...e6-e5), which failed to develop a new unit (be it Pawn or Piece). The result of this can be seen below ...

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The Result of the Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)), After 6...Nf6
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 6...Nf6
After 6...Nf6. When it comes to the development phase, counting Castling as one developing move (one Tempo, in itself):
  • White has spent 6 Tempi to get 6 units developed;

  • Black has spent 6 Tempi to get 4 units developed.
If neither side wastes any Tempi, efficient or optimum development would result in Black having developed an equal number of units at the end of his last move.

If, after his last move, Black is behind one or more Tempos, then Black has lost one or more Tempos, meaning he has fallen behind in the race to develop his army. That's precisely what Black has done, in No.28B (after 6...Ng8-f6), having fallen two Tempi behind White's development.

Tempo vs. Tempi There's an excellent explanation of Time / Tempo / Tempi, on Chess.com

And it gets worse, for Black ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)), After 7.b4 Bxb4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 7.b4 Bxb4
After 7.b4 Bxb4, White sacrifices his b-Pawn (7.b2-b4), to tempt Black to spend a Tempo developing his King Bishop, perhaps further out than he would otherwise have chosen -- for the sake of capturing the free Pawn (7...Bf8xb4).

This leads to the loss of Black's dark-Bishop.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)), After 8.Nxe5 Nxe5
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 8.Nxe5 Nxe5
After 8.Nxe5 Nxe5, White deliberately launches his King Knight into an unequal trade, in order to take-out Black's e-Pawn (8.Nf3xe5). Black's Queen Knight completes the trade (8...Nc6xe5).

White may have lost a more-valuable Piece, to capture a lowly Pawn; but, Black has lost precious development time, developing that e-Pawn, (to give support to the Advanced d-Pawn), only to end up losing that e-Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - The Advanced Pawn, Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)), After 9.Qa4+
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
Black P-Q5 against the English
(2 of 3), After 9.Qa4+
After 9.Qa4+, White's Queen moves in to capture Black's Bb4.

White's Queen checks to prevent Black from removing his dark-Bishop from its position of mortal danger. Black must spend a Tempo getting his King out of check.

Whatever Black does; whether he spends a Tempo to Interpose a Pawn (9...c7-c6) or Piece (9...Bc8-d7; 9...Qd8-d7), it will trigger White's turn, which will be 10.Qa4xb4, without any hesitation!

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Summary of the Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)...

  1. The extent of Black's "dubious" Advanced Pawn (3...d5-d4) is revealed, in this continuation from No.28A.

  2. Black appears compelled to lose two Tempi, first to gain the Advanced Pawn (2...d7-d5 » 3...d5-d4), and second to provide it with Pawn support (1...e7-e6 » 5...e6-e5). Meanwhile, White continues to develop efficiently, not squandering any Tempi.

  3. White sacrifices his b-Pawn (7.b2-b4), leaving it En Prise for Black's dark-Bishop (7...Bf8xb4). White will get the last laugh, as he can later win Black's dark-Bishop, with the Queen (after 9.Qd1-a4+).

  4. White deliberately launches his King Knight into an unequal trade, in order to take-out Black's e-Pawn (8.Nf3xe5). Black's Queen Knight completes the trade (8...Nc6xe5).

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PGN

[Event "PCC, p49 Diagram NO.28B"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Horowitz"]
[Black "Mott-Smith"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "17"]

1. c4 e6 2. g3 d5 3. Nf3 d4 4. Bg2 Nc6 5. O-O e5 6. d3 {PCC, p49 Diagram NO.28B} Nf6 7. b4 Bxb4 8. Nxe5 Nxe5 9. Qa4+ *

End.

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