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The Advanced Pawn
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.27A & NO.27B, p47-48
Teschner v. Fuderer, 1957

In both No.26A & No.27A, White opens with the Queen Pawn Game (1.d2-d4). Then comes the difference, as Black tries two Opening variations to prevent White gaining the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5):

Either way, White has options to create his Benoni Pawn at Q5, and I speculate that perhaps this is one of the reasons that 1...d7-d5 is more commonly seen among elite Chess players?

Anyway, once secured at d5, White's Benoni Pawn restricts Black's development on, or through, the squares c6 & e6, which makes it more awkward for Black to develop and to effectively coordinate his army for offensive purposes.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.47, No.27A, after 4.f4
  2. PCC, p.48, No.27B, after 10.O-O
  3. Result of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2).
  4. Summary of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2).
  5. PGN

The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.47, No.27A, after 4.f4

After: 1.d4 c5 2.d5 e5 3.e4 d6 4.f4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27A - Page 47
After: 4.f4

1. White's d-Pawn becomes the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 1.d4 c5 2.d5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 1.d4 c5 2.d5
After 1.d4 c5 2.d5, White's d-Pawn becomes the Benoni Pawn at Q5, within 2 turns.

White opens with another Queen Pawn Game (1.d2-d4), just like in No.26A. But, this time, instead of developing his King Knight to f6, Black attacks White's d-Pawn, with his c-Pawn (1...c7-c5) ...

This allows White to expand his d-Pawn (2.d4-d5), turning it into an Advanced Pawn, which is the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5).

The benefit of the Advanced Pawn on the d-file is it gets automatic support from the Qd1.

2. White's e-Pawn supports the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 2...e5 3.e4
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 2...e5 3.e4
After 2...e5 3.e4, Black's e-Pawn advance (2...e7-e5) isn't enough to prevent White from developing his e-Pawn (3.e2-e4), so that it co-supports the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), along with Qd1.

The two White Pawns now form an Advanced Chain (e4,d5).

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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.48, No.27B, after 10.O-O

After: 4...Nd7 5.Nf3 g6 6.fxe5 Nxe5 7.Bb5 Bd7 8.Bxd7 Qxd7 9.Nxe5 dxe5 10.O-O

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - Page 48
After: 10.O-O

3. White prepares to transform his Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) into a Protected Passed Pawn

During this phase, there's a series of exchanges: Pawns on e5; light-Bishops on d7; and Knights on e5:

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 4.f4 Nd7
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 4.f4 Nd7
After 4.f4 Nd7, White develops his f-Pawn, to attack Black's e-Pawn (4.f2-f4). White intends to use his f-Pawn to take-out Black's e-Pawn.

As a precaution, Black brings his Queen Knight into position (4...Nb8-d7), ready to complete the potential Pawn exchange.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 5.Nf3
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 5.Nf3
After 5.Nf3, White's develops his King Knight (5.Ng1-f3), which will play a key role in turning the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) into a Protected Passed Pawn ...
After White trades Pawns on e5, he intends to trade Knights, again on e5, when Black's Nd7 completes the Pawn exchange there.

White's Knight on e5 will force Black's d-Pawn to capture (...d6xe5), removing the last obstruction from White's d5-Pawn, converting it into the Protected Passed Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 6.fxe5 Nxe5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 6.fxe5 Nxe5
After 6.fxe5 Nxe5, the Pawn exchange takes place, with Black's Queen Knight completing the trade (6.f4xe5 Nd7xe5), as mentioned.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 7.Bb5+ Bd7 9.Bxd7+ Qxd7
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 7.Bb5+ Bd7 9.Bxd7+ Qxd7
After 7.Bb5+ Bd7 9.Bxd7+ Qxd7, White exchanges light-Bishops, following an attack on Black's exposed King. Black's Queen completes the trade.

4. White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) is transformed into a
Protected Passed Pawn

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 9.Nxe5 dxe5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 9.Nxe5 dxe5
After 9.Nxe5 dxe5, White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) becomes a Protected Passed Pawn, following the Knight exchange on e5 (9.Nf3xe5 d6xe5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 10.O-O
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 10.O-O
After 10.O-O, White Castles Kingside immediately after that exchange of Knights. Castling instantly gives White the Half-open f-file, to add to the advantage of the Protected Passed Pawn (d5).

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The Result of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27A to 27B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2), After 10.O-O
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2),
After 10.O-O
After 10.O-O. Naturally, there are similarities with the White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), as seen in No.26.

Primarily, it's the restricting factor in Black's own territory: the d5-Pawn denies Black the choice of safely posting his Pieces to the squares c6 & e6.

So, Black is denied two good squares for getting his Pieces onto, which in turn restricts efficient development and coordination of Black's army.

White can take advantage of Black's need to take extra moves to get his Pieces to good squares, for coordinating attacks.


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Summary of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2)...

  1. White's d-Pawn quickly -- within two turns -- becomes the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), when Black's opening c-Pawn advance/attack (1...c7-c5), permits White's d-Pawn to walk right by, and into its Advanced position.

  2. White's e-Pawn (3.e2-e4) provides additional support for the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), creating an Advanced Chain formation in the Center (e4,d5).

  3. White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) denies Black's Pieces access to two good squares in Black's own territory (c6 & e6). This reduces the efficiency and effectiveness of Black's ability to coordinate his army during the development phase. It wastes time, as Black may have to make multiple moves of the same Piece(s) just to regroup into more effective positions, which gives White opportunities to improve the deployment of his own troops.

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PGN

[Event "Vienna ch-EUR tt"]
[Site ""]
[Date "1957.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Teschner, Rudolf"]
[Black "Fuderer, Andrija"]
[Result "1-0"]
[NIC "OI 9.6"]
[ECO "A44"]
[PlyCount "79"]

1. d4 c5 2. d5 e5 3. e4 d6 4. f4 {PCC p.47 No.27A} Nd7 5. Nf3 g6 6. fxe5 Nxe5 7. Bb5 Bd7 8. Bxd7 Qxd7 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. O-O {PCC p.48 No.27B} Bg7 11. Be3 b6 12. Qf3 f6 13. Nc3 Ne7 14. a4 O-O 15. a5 Rab8 16. axb6 axb6 17. Qe2 f5 18. Bg5 Nc8 19. Qb5 Qb7 20. Qc6 h6 21. Bh4 g5 22. Be1 Qe7 23. exf5 Nd6 24. Nb5 Nxb5 25. Qxb5 e4 26. Bg3 Be5 27. Bxe5 Qxe5 28. Qd7 Rf7 29. Qe6 Re8 30. Qxh6 e3 31. Rae1 Qxd5 32. Qg6 Kf8 33. Re2 Re4 34. Qxb6 g4 35. Qb8 Kg7 36. Qg3 Rxf5 37. Rxf5 Qxf5 38. Rxe3 Rb4 39. Qc7 Kg6 40. Qd6 1-0

End.

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