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The Advanced Pawn
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.26A & NO.26B, p46
Taimanov v. Trifunovich, 1957

White's goal is to gain an Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5), and his plan to achieve this is to allow his original d-Pawn to be sacrificed, in order to establish the c-Pawn at d5.

White's Advanced Pawn will help to Control the Center, while applying Cramp that restricts the effectiveness of Black's development.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.46, No.26A, after 7.f4
  2. PCC, p.46, No.26B, after 11.O-O
  3. Result of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2).
  4. Summary of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2).
  5. PGN

The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.46, No.26A, after 7.f4

After: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 g6 7.f4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - Page 46
After: 7.f4

1. White's d-Pawn becomes a temporary Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4
After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4, White starts with a Queen Pawn Game (1.d2-d4). Then, the development of Black's King Knight (1...Ng8-f6) enables White to bring his c-Pawn to the front line (2.c2-c4), forming a 2-Pawn phalanx alongside the d-Pawn.

White's c-Pawn is in position, ready for the d-Pawn to be pushed up to d5. From here, if Black does nothing about it, White can continue to reinforce what will be an Advanced Chain (c4,d5) ...

Alternatively, if Black chooses to remove White's original d5-Pawn, White will have his c4-Pawn all ready to replace it (c4xd5), maintaining an Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 2...c5 3.d5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 2...c5 3.d5
After 2...c5 3.d5, White gains his temporary Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5).

Black attacks with his c-Pawn (2...c7-c5), but White simply expands his d-Pawn beyond that attack, moving it up into the Advanced position (3.d4-d5).

2. White gains the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 3...e6 4.Nc3
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 3...e6 4.Nc3
After 3...e6 4.Nc3, Black's e-Pawn attacks White's Advanced Pawn (3...e7-e6).

White is happy for his d5-Pawn to be captured (...e6xd5), as his reply (c4xd5) will reestablish an Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5). So, White concentrates on developing a Piece ...

Note: White chooses to develop his Queen Knight to c3 (4.Nb1-c3). This is important, as it now supports the Q5 square -- if the inevitable happens, and the Pawn exchange leaves White with his c-Pawn on d5, then it will already have support from White's Nc3.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 4...exd5 5.cxd5
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 4...exd5 5.cxd5
After 4...exd5 5.cxd5, the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) is created.

White gains his strategic (long-term) Advanced Pawn at Q5, as Black's choice to trade Pawns, leaves White's c4-Pawn on d5 (4...e6xd5 5.c4xd5), as has already been explained.

White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) is immediately supported by the Nc3 & Qd1.

3. White reinforces his Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5)

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 5...d6 6.e4
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 5...d6 6.e4
After 5...d6 6.e4, Black develops his d-Pawn (5...d7-d6) to blockade White's Advanced Pawn, to stop it from advancing any further (note: White's Queen can support it all the way up the d-file, if Black were to let White freely advance his new d-Pawn).

White focus turns to reinforcing support for his Advanced Pawn at Q5. This he does with the development of his e-Pawn (6.e2-e4).

4. White prepares to push his e-Pawn into an Advanced position

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 7.f4
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 7.f4
After 7.f4, the development of White's f-Pawn (7.f2-f4) supports the intended expansion of White's e-Pawn into an Advanced position (e4-e5).

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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.46, No.26B, after 11.O-O

After: 7...Bg7 8. Bb5+ Nfd7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. Nf3 Na6 11.O-O

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26B - Page 46
After: 11.O-O
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 8.Bb5+ Nfd7 9.Bd3
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 8.Bb5+ Nfd7 9.Bd3
After 8.Bb5+ Nfd7 9.Bd3, the attack on Black's King (8.Bf1-b5+), by White's light-Bishop, is an "In-between Move," which works to force Black to block the check with his King Knight (8...Nf6-d7) ...

This removes the pressure which was being applied against White's Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5).

H&M-S say that Black couldn't play 8...Nb8-d7, because it "loses a piece to
9 P-K5
(9.e4-e5) with threat of P-K6 (10.e5-e6)."

With that in-between move done, White brings his light-Bishop closer to home, setting it down on d3 (9.Bb5-d3).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 10.Nf3
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 10.Nf3
After 10.Nf3, White's King Knight is developed to f3 (10.Ng1-f3), which adds another unit that's coordinated to the e5-square, ready for a proposed e4-e5 push.

The Knight's development also clears the back rank, enabling White to Castle Kingside, which is what happens next.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 11.O-O
The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 11.O-O
After 11.O-O, H&M-S end there example with the Kingside Castling by White.

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The Result of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 5.cxd5 » 6.e4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 5.cxd5 » 6.e4
After 5.cxd5 » 6.e4, White has just achieved his initial objective: gaining the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5), when his c-Pawn completed the Pawn exchange on d5 (5.c4xd5); and has reinforced its position with his e-Pawn (6.e2-e4).

White intends to move his e-Pawn on to e5, but in the mean time, it combines with the Nc3 & Qd1, to provide rock-solid support for the d5-Pawn. Sure, Black's Nf6 could, theoretically take White's d5-Pawn (...Nf6xd5), but White can either replace it with his e-Pawn (e4xd5) or gain the advantage of a Strong Outpost Station, on d5, occupied by the Knight (Nc3xd5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2), After 6.e4
(RESULT) The Advanced Pawn,
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2),
After 6.e4
After 6.e4, Black really has no option but to leave White's d5-Pawn alone, and continue development elsewhere.

Black needs to develop his Minor Pieces: Nb8, Bc8 & Bf8. But, they are unable to find good squares to develop onto. Black is suffering from a Cramped Position.

Looking at each of Black's three Minor Pieces, and their developmental problems:

Developmental Problems for Black's Nb8

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5, Developmental Problems for Black's Nb8, After 6.e4
(RESULT) The Benoni Pawn at Q5,
Developmental Problems for Black's Nb8, After 6.e4
1...Nb8-c6, isn't possible due to White's Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5).

1...Nb8-d7, appears possible at first. But White's plan is to advance his e-Pawn to e5, which will force Black's Nf6 to flee. White's Qd1 guards h5; to return to b8 would effectively "un-develop" Black's King Knight (time-wasting; also blocks Kingside Castling). So, d7 must be clear for Black's Nf6. This means Black must avoid sending his Queen Knight there.

1...Nb8-a6, is the move Black played in the game. The upside is it gets the Knight out into the game. The downside is it's an inferior move, taking the Queen Knight away from the threats coming through the Center. Black will have to spend at least another turn getting this Knight into a more effective position.

Developmental Problems for Black's Bc8

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5, Developmental Problems for Black's Bc8, After 6.e4
(RESULT) The Benoni Pawn at Q5,
Developmental Problems for Black's Bc8, After 6.e4
Bc8, has nowhere to go to immediately. Yes, 1...Bc8-d7 is technically an option, but it'll present the same problem for Black as ...Nb8-d7, just mentioned.

The other option is to advance the b-Pawn (1...b7-b6) and Fianchetto the Bishop (2...Bc8-b7).

The first problem is it requires Black to spend a move to move the b-Pawn. The second problem is by moving the b-Pawn, it gives White a future Sixth Rank Outpost (c6), secured by White's Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5).

All other squares down the c8-h3 diagonal are guarded by White units, so must be dis-counted as move options.

Developmental Problems for Black's Bf8

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - The Advanced Pawn, The Benoni Pawn at Q5, Developmental Problems for Black's Bf8, After 6.e4
(RESULT) The Benoni Pawn at Q5,
Developmental Problems for Black's Bf8, After 6.e4
Bf8, is currently a Bad Bishop, as its mobility is severely restricted by its own Pawns.

In the game, Black Fianchettoed his King Bishop (7...Bf8-g7). However, the process has made Black vulnerable on the dark-squares, in the very region he intends to Castle his King (see Weak-square Complex, for further details).

And, of course, Black also had to spend a turn getting his g-Pawn out of the way, just to be able to develop his dark-Bishop out of its Bad position.

So, the ultimate result of White's Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5) appears to be the Cramped Position it causes in Black's territory, which hampers Black's development.

While Black is struggling to get his Pieces to good squares, White has greater freedom to further develop and expand his army, gaining even better territory for his army, as a whole, while removing even more options from Black's army.


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Summary of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2)...

  1. White opens the game with his c- & d-Pawns coming out to their fourth rank squares. White begins with the Queen Pawn Game (1.d2-d4) and, when Black develops his King Knight (1...Ng8-f6), White's c-Pawn is straight out to c4 (2.c2-c4), to sit in Phalanx formation alongside the d-Pawn.

  2. The c-Pawn will become the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), following an exchange of Pawns on d5, after White expands his original d-Pawn to d5 (3.d4-d5) and Black's e-Pawn captures it (4...e6xd5). White's completes the Pawn trade with his c-Pawn (5.c4xd5), becoming the long-term Advanced Pawn.

  3. White's e-Pawn adds a third unit of support to his Benoni Pawn at Q5 (6.e2-e4), though, long-term, White intends to push his e-Pawn up to e5, creating a second Advanced Pawn.

  4. The result of the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) is the Cramped Position it causes Black, restricting the development of his Minor Pieces. Black will be forced to develop them to weaker positions, which will have a negative impact on his overall game plan.

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PGN

[Event "PCC, p46 Diagram NO.26A and 26B"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1957"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Taimanov"]
[Black "Trifunovich"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "21"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 e6 4. Nc3 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 6. e4 g6 7. f4 {PCC, p46 Diagram NO.26A} Bg7 8. Bb5+ Nfd7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. Nf3 Na6 11. O-O {PCC, p46 Diagram NO.26B} *

End.

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