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The Isolated Pawn
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO.192, p271-272
Ivkov v. Taimanov, 1955

In this example, White incurs Doubled Isolated Pawns, on the e-file.

Similar to the example in No.191, a lead in development, and having the benefit of two Half-Open Files (d & f), proves to be sufficient compensation that makes White's Doubled Isolani an Acceptable weakness.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.271, No.192, after 5...d6
  2. Result of an Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2).
  3. Summary of an Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2).
  4. PGN

Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.271, No.192, after 5...d6

After: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - Page 271
After: 5...d6

1. How White incurs an Acceptable Doubled Isolani, on the e-file

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 1.e4 to 3.d4
The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 1.e4 to 3.d4
After 1.e4 to 3.d4, White's d-Pawn (3.d2-d4) develops to challenge Black's c-Pawn (1...c7-c5), in a position from the Sicilian Defence (1.e2-e4 c7-c5).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4
The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4
After 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4, White loses his d-Pawn, as Black's c5-Pawn breaks the tension, to trade Pawns on d4 (3...c5xd4), with White's King Knight completing the trade (4.Nf3xd4).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 4...Nf6 to 7.Bb5
The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 4...Nf6 to 7.Bb5
After 4...Nf6 to 7.Bb5, both sides continue with more development, with the most notable move being Black's King Knight, which develops (4...Ng8-f6) and then expands (6...Nf6-g4) to attack White's dark-Bishop (6.Bc1-e3).

The attack by Black's Ng4 is significant, as it will force an exchange on e3, which will leave White's f-Pawn Doubled and Isolated on the e-file.

In the same sequence, White's light-Bishop Pins Black's Nc6, as it's developed (7.Bf1-b5). As it's an Absolute Pin, it stops Black from trading Knights, on d4.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 7...Nxe3 8.fxe3
The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 7...Nxe3 8.fxe3
After 7...Nxe3 8.fxe3, White incurs the Doubled Isolani, on the e-file, as Black decides to force the exchange of his Knight, for White's dark-Bishop (7...Ng4xe3).

White's f-Pawn completes the trade (8.f2xe3), causing itself and White's original e-Pawn to become Doubled and Isolated, on the e-file.

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The Result of an Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2)...

2. Why White's Doubled Isolated e-Pawns are Acceptable

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - (RESULT) The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 8.fxe3
(RESULT) The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 8.fxe3
After 8.fxe3, White's lead in development* and the benefit of two Half-Open Files (d & f) are considered an acceptable trade for incurring the Doubled Isolani, on the e-file (8.f2xe3).
* White's lead in development includes having developed all of his Minor Pieces, and he's ready to Castle Kingside.

White's Queen already has the benefit of the Half-Open d-file, and White's King Rook will gain the benefit of the Half-Open f-file, as soon as White Castles Kingside, and it will then be targeting Black's vulnerable f7-Pawn (it's vulnerable because it only has its King for support).

3. How White uses his cumulative advantages, to win, despite having incurred the Doubled Isolated e-Pawns

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - (RESULT) The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 8...Bd7 9.O-O
(RESULT) The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 8...Bd7 9.O-O
After 8...Bd7 9.O-O, White takes advantage of his Half-Open f-file, the very instant he Castles Kingside (9.O-O), as it leaves White's King Rook occupying the Half-Open f-file, targeting all the way up to Black's vulnerable f7-Pawn.

Regarding Black's move, his light-Bishop (8...Bc8-d7) appears to be trying to cover two different threats:
  1. The primary threat is from White's Bb5, which is still on the a4-e8 diagonal, leading to Black's King (Ke8);

  2. The secondary threat will come from White's Queen (Qd1) along the Half-Open d-file, if White can find a way to clear the obstructions (d6-Pawn and Bd7).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - (RESULT) The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 9...Ne5 to 12...dxe5
(RESULT) The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 9...Ne5 to 12...dxe5
After 9...Ne5 to 12...dxe5, White takes advantage of his lead in development, by using his Minor Pieces to exchange Black's developed Minor Pieces off the board, to Open the d-file, to Black's Queen. The move also leaves Black with Doubled Pawns, on the e-file.

Black tries to protect his d6-Pawn, by sending his Knight to occupy the e5-Outpost (9...Nc6-e5), which blockades White's e4-Pawn, preventing its advance ...

Without the blockade, White's leading Doubled Isolani (e4) it would attack Black's d6-Pawn and White would not hesitate to trade his weak e-Pawn for Black's somewhat stronger d6-Pawn, in addition to causing the d-file to become Open.

White then launches his series of Minor Piece swaps, which does leave the d-file fully Open: both light-Bishops are exchanged (10.Nd4-f3 Bd7xb5 11.Nc3xb5), followed by a Knight exchange that removes Black's e5-Outpost Knight (11...Qd8-d7 12.Nf3xe5).

As Black's d6-Pawn completes the trade (12...d6xe5), not only does it Open the d-file, it also leaves Black with Doubled Pawns, on the e-file.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 192 - (RESULT) The Isolated Pawn, Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2), After 13.Qxd7+ Kxd7 14.Rxf7
(RESULT) The Isolated Pawn,
Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2),
After 13.Qxd7+ Kxd7 14.Rxf7
After 13.Qxd7+ Kxd7 14.Rxf7, White takes advantage of both his lead in development and his Half-Open f-file, to take-out Black's vulnerable f7-Pawn ...

This leaves White with a Rook on the 7th Rank, and leaves Black with Doubled Isolated Pawns, on the e-file (just like White, only without managing to benefit from White's advantages).

Part of Black being behind in development is his King had not yet Castled to the Kingside. If he had, Black's King Rook would already be on the f-file, supporting Black's f7-Pawn.

However, because Black's King is still in the middle, and because Black's non-developed dark-Bishop (Bf8) is preventing Black's Rook getting onto f8, it leaves Black's King having to defend his f7-Pawn.

In addition to that, Black's King is also left supporting its Queen (Qd7), which is under attack from White's Queen (Qd1), along the now-Open d-file.

Being White's turn, he takes advantage of his lead in development to remove BOTH defenders (Ke8 & Qd7) from Black's f7-Pawn, by forcing the exchange of Queens (13.Qd1xd7+ Ke8xd7).

That, in turn, enables White's Rf1 to take advantage of the Half-Open f-file, to take-out Black's f7-Pawn (14.Rf1xf7).

The capture of Black's f7-Pawn converts Black's Doubled e-Pawns into a Doubled Isolani, just like White's got.

The key difference is White had a number of advantages that he's already taken advantage of, to weaken Black's position.

Black incurs his Doubled Isolated Pawns at his weakest moment, giving White a game-winning advantage.

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Summary of an Acceptable Doubled Isolani (2 of 2)...

  1. White incurs an Acceptable Doubled Isolani, on the e-file. White loses his d-Pawn in an exchange with Black's c-Pawn, in a position from the Sicilian Defence (1.e2-e4 c7-c5, followed by 3...c5xd4 4.Nf3xd4). White incurs the Doubled Isolani, on the e-file, as Black decides to force the exchange of his Knight (4...Ng8-f6 » 6...Nf6-g4), for White's dark-Bishop (7...Ng4xe3 8.f2xe3).

  2. White's Doubled Isolated e-Pawns is considered an Acceptable weakness, because it's done in exchange for a number of cumulative advantages: a lead in development, and two Half-Open Files (d & f).

  3. White uses his cumulative advantages, to win, despite having incurred the Doubled Isolated e-Pawns:

    • The Half-Open f-file is used by White's King Rook, after Castling, to take-out Black's vulnerable f7-Pawn, which leaves White with a Rook on the 7th Rank, and also plays a role in Black also incurring a Doubled Isolani, on the e-file.

    • The lead in development and Half-Open d-file are used by White to exchange Minor Pieces off the board, to Open the d-file, to Black's Queen. The move also leaves Black with Doubled Pawns, on the e-file.

  4. Both sides incur Doubled Isolated Pawns, on the e-file. The key difference is White had a number of advantages that he's already taken advantage of, to weaken Black's position. Black incurs his Doubled Isolated Pawns at his weakest moment, giving White a game-winning advantage.

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PGN

[Event "Hastings"]
[Site "Hastings"]
[Date "1955.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Borislav Ivkov"]
[Black "Mark Taimanov"]
[ECO "B56"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 {PCC p.271 No.192} 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bb5 Nxe3 8.fxe3 Bd7 9.O-O Ne5 10.Nf3 Bxb5 11.Nxb5 Qd7 12.Nxe5 dxe5 13.Qxd7+ Kxd7 14.Rxf7 Kc6 15.Nc3 Rd8 16.Rd1 Rxd1+ 17.Nxd1 g6 18.Kf1 Kd6 19.Rf2 Bh6 20.Rd2+ Ke6 21.c4 Bg5 22.Ke2 h5 23.Nc3 Rc8 24.b3 a6 25.a4 Rc6 26.Nd5 Kf7 27.a5 Rc5 28.Ra2 e6 29.Nb6 Bd8 30.b4 Rc6 31.c5 Bxb6 32.axb6 Ke7 33.Rxa6 1-0

End.

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