« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples

Passed Pawn
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO. 178, p253
Example Sequence

The take-home lesson from this example is that a Crippled Majority (of Pawns) is usually incapable of creating a Passed Pawn. And, if a Pawn can't get "Passed", it cannot gain Promotion.

H&M-S say: "If for any reason a playing cannot mobilize his majority side, the stands to lose. The commonest cause of such a misfortune is that his majority is crippled by a doubled or a backward pawn."

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.253, No. 178, before 1.Kf2
  2. Result of the Crippled Majority.
  3. Summary of the Crippled Majority.
  4. PGN
Additional analysis includes the:

The Crippled Majority (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.253, No. 178, before 1.Kf2

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - Page 253
Before: 1.Kf2
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - The Passed Pawn, The Crippled Majority (1 of 2), Before 1.Kf2
The Passed Pawn,
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2),
Before 1.Kf2
Before 1.Kf2, Black's Queenside Pawns are the "Crippled Majority," crippled by way of the Doubled Pawns on the b-file.

In this weakened structure, they're unable to force through a Passed Pawn (see the additional analysis, below, for more details).

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

The Result of the Crippled Majority (1 of 2)...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - The Passed Pawn, The Crippled Majority (1 of 2), After 1.Kf2 and 2.Ke3
(RESULT) The Passed Pawn,
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2),
After 1.Kf2 » 2.Ke3
After 1.Kf2 » 2.Ke3, White first makes sure his King is much closer to the Queenside, so it can take-out Black's three Pawns, to gain at least one Passed Pawn, which White will be able to escort up the board, to gain Promotion.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - The Passed Pawn, The Crippled Majority (1 of 2), After 2...Kf5 3.g6
(RESULT) The Passed Pawn,
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2),
After 2...Kf5 3.g6
After 2...Kf5 3.g6, White launches his attack on Black's Isolated Kingside Pawn.

Just as Black's King gets within range (2...Ke6-f5), White moves his g-Pawn up to attack Black's h-Pawn (3.g5-g6).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - The Passed Pawn, The Crippled Majority (1 of 2), After 3...hxg6 4.hxg6 Kxg6
(RESULT) The Passed Pawn,
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2),
After 3...hxg6 4.hxg6 Kxg6
After 3...hxg6 4.hxg6 Kxg6, Black is forced to exchange Pawns on the Kingside (3...h7xg6 4.h5xg6), and clear-up with the King (4...Kf5xg6).

Unfortunately, for Black, this has resulted in his King being dragged too far away from his Queenside Pawns ...
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 178 - The Passed Pawn, The Crippled Majority (1 of 2), After 5.Kd4
(RESULT) The Passed Pawn,
The Crippled Majority (1 of 2),
After 5.Kd4
After 5.Ke3-d4, White's King will be unstoppable from taking-out Black's Crippled Majority, and gaining at least one Passed Pawn, which White's King can escort up to gain Promotion.

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

Summary of the Crippled Majority (1 of 2)...

  1. Leave your Pawn Majority alone (e.g. Before 1.Kf2); they don't need to be moved, as the enemy's Pawn Majority is "Crippled," and cannot force through a Passed Pawn of their own (well, not without you making a silly mistake -- see the additional analysis, below).

  2. Get the King closer to the enemy's Crippled Majority (e.g. 1.Kg1-f2 » 2.Kf2-e3), so it can strike the weakest point (e.g. the rear of the Doubled Pawns, or the Backward Pawn), when the enemy King has been dragged further away, by needing to take-out your Pawn Majority (which is threatening to create a Passed Pawn a few short paces away from the Promotion squares).

  3. Allow your Pawn Majority be sacrificed in order to drag the enemy King further away from his Crippled Majority on the opposite flank. In the example, White attacked Black's Isolated h-Pawn, threatening to force through a Passed Pawn. Black had no choice to liquidate that solitary Pawn, to trade both of White's Kingside Pawn threats off the board (3...h7xg6 4.h5xg6). Black's King was dragged further away from his Crippled Majority, in order to complete the trade (4...Kf5xg6).

  4. Get your King across to the enemy's Crippled Majority, and begin removing them from their Blockade of your Pawn Minority. Start at the back of the primary weakness (e.g. the rear of the Doubled Pawns) and capture each one methodically. You may lose one of your Pawns in the process, but should be able to convert one into a Passed Pawn, which your King can then escort up to gain Promotion -- the enemy King won't be able to get beyond your King to prevent it.

[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

Revealing the Ineffectiveness of Black's Crippled Majority...

In the actual example, (as shown above), H&M-S show how White should allow his Kingside Pawn Majority to be sacrificed, in order to pull Black's King further away from his unfortunate Queenside Pawns -- this enables White's King to get across to free his two Queenside Pawns, by taking-out Black's Crippled Majority, before advancing his Passed Pawns toward Promotion.

Here, we see what happens if the Queenside Pawns attack each other, first, and why, no matter who strikes first, Black's Crippled Majority is incapable of forcing through a Passed Pawn ...

Hypothetical Example 1:
White to play; White Attacks the Crippled Majority (1.a2-a3)


Hypothetical Example 2:
White to play; White Attacks the Crippled Majority (1.b2-b3)


Hypothetical Example 3:
Black to play; Black Attacks the White Pawn Minority (1...a4-a3)


Hypothetical Example 4:
Black to play; Black Attacks the White Pawn Minority (1...b4-b3)


[Jump to ChessFlash Viewer]

PGN

[Event "PCC, p253 Diagram NO. 178"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Horowitz"]
[Black "Mott-Smith"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/5k1p/8/1p4PP/pp6/8/PP6/6K1 w - - 0 0"]
[PlyCount "8"]

{PCC, p253 Diagram NO.178} 1. Kf2 Ke6 2. Ke3 Kf5 3. g6 hxg6 4. hxg6 Kxg6 5.Kd4 *

End.

« Back to the other Point Count Chess Examples