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Bishop-pair
The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit

Point Count Chess, NO. 147, p210, Example Sequence

This could be titled the "Reverse Ruy Lopez Question", as it's White who gains both the Bishop-pair, and the Doubled Pawn structure; whereas, in the position of The Ruy Lopez Question, it's Black who gains them.

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.210, No. 147, after 6.bxc3
  2. PGN
Additional analysis includes the:

The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.210, No. 147, after 6.bxc3

After: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 147 - Page 210
After: 6.bxc3
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 147 - The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit, The Ruy Lopez Question, After 5.a3
The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit, After 5.a3
This is where the event occurs, as White's a-Pawn forces Black into trading the dark-Bishop for White's Knight, leading to White's reply that gives him the Doubled Pawn structure, plus the Bishop-pair.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 147 - The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit, The Ruy Lopez Question, After 5...Bxc3+ 6.bzc3
The Bishop-Pair in the Queen's Gambit, After 5...Bxc3+ 6.bxc3
Now we reach the position featured by H&M-S (No. 147).

White has the Doubled Pawns, and the Bishop-pair.

He's also got an Isolated Pawn (a3), but H&M-S suggest that White has the remainder of the game to make sure it doesn't become White's Achilles heel.

Black has the a superior Pawn Structure, and the two Knights.
Following the position of The Ruy Lopez Question, Black was able to overcome the structural weakness of his Doubled Pawns, by removing one of White's two Knights, which reduced White to having to make best use of the awkward pairing of the Bishop & Knight.

That might be a workable strategy for White, in this situation (The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit) ... White would want to hold onto the Bishop-pair, while seeking ways to take-out one of Black's Knights -- perhaps seeking to trade Kingside Knights.

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Comparing Positions: The Ruy Lopez Question vs.
The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit ...

Comparison 1: Pawn Contribution to Center Control

In The Ruy Lopez Question, Black is moving his Pawn in a direction going away from the Center ...

Point Count Chess - IE - The Ruy Lopez Question, After 4...dxc6 - No Highlights
(COMPARISON 1)
The Ruy Lopez Question
After: 4...dxc6
Point Count Chess - IE - The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, After 6.bxc3
(COMPARISON 1)
The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, After: 6.bxc3

Whereas, in The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, White is reinforcing the Center, by moving his Pawn toward the Center. This helps to strengthen White's claim for Control of the Center.

In The Ruy Lopez Question, while Black's c6-Pawn still has contact with the Center, it doesn't add any more Pawns to assist with Black's ability to contest the Center.

Comparison 2: The Weak Pawn Structures that are Created

In The Ruy Lopez Question, Black only has the Doubled Pawns (c7,c6) to concern himself with. Black has to work hard and fast, to turn his Doubled Pawns into an asset that does make a central contribution to Black's game (see No. 146A to 146C) ...

Point Count Chess - IE - The Ruy Lopez Question, After 4...dxc6 - No Highlights
(COMPARISON 2)
The Ruy Lopez Question
After: 4...dxc6
Point Count Chess - IE - The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, After 6.bxc3
(COMPARISON 2)
The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, After: 6.bxc3

Whereas, in The Bishop-pair in the Queen's Gambit, White has to contend himself with TWO sets of Weak Pawns: Doubled Pawns (c3,c4) and an Isolated Pawn (a3).

H&M-S point out that White can un-double his Pawns by capturing Black's d5-Pawn (7.c4xd5), and then play the Queen's Gambit "for a second time," after 8.c3-c4.

As mentioned earlier, White's main weakness is his Isolated Pawn (a3). White has to continue his game, with an eye on not letting this weakness lead to his downfall. This is something that Black doesn't have to contend with, in the position of The Ruy Lopez Question. The positive aspect, for White, is he gets the benefit of the Half-Open b-file, which his Queen Rook might be able to take advantage of.


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PGN

[Event "PCC, p210 Diagram NO. 147"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Horowitz"]
[Black "Mott-Smith"]
[Result "*"]
[PlyCount "11"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 {PCC, p210 Diagram NO. 147} *

End.

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