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Superior Development
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece (2 of 2)

Point Count Chess, NO. 130, p184
Alekhine v. Wolf, 1922

In No.129, I added a note about the Maxim: "Never move the same piece twice until you have moved each piece once."

That advice should be taken as a guide, and not as an unbreakable rule, as the following example is about to show the odd occasion when making Multiple Moves with the Same Piece(s) can be advantageous.

H&M-S admit that this will only work in "exceptional circumstances", and they list three conditions that must be met, in order for said Maxim to be broken ...

  1. You are reliant on your opponent making a bad mistake, first (#1).

  2. There must be potential for some sort of strategical advantage (#2).

  3. You must be capable of finding and using precise tactics, so your opponent doesn't shut down your attempted maneuver (#3).

These three factors will be seen in my analysis, below ...

Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the position featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.184, No. 130, after 11...Rg8
  2. PGN

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece (2 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.184, No. 130, after 11...Rg8

After: 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c5 3.c4 cxd4 4.cxd5 Nf6 5.Nxd4 a6 6.e4 Nxe4 7.Qa4+ Bd7 8.Qb3 Nc5 9.Qe3 g6 10.Nf3 Qc7 11.Qc3 Rg8

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Page 184
After: 11...Rg8
Just before they discuss this, H&M-S list three reasons for lost Tempos, with regards to Piece Development:
  1. Pawn moves: moving a Pawn fails to develop a Piece, so it's a lost opportunity to increase your Tempo tally;

  2. Multiple moves by the same Piece: moving the same Piece again, fails to develop a new, not-yet-developed Piece (another lost opportunity to increase your Tempo tally);

  3. Exchanges: any Piece that had been developed is taken off the board, during the exchange. This removes that Piece's development from the Tempo tally.
In the example, below, the "TEMPO" tally focuses on Tempos lost by Multiple Moves of the Same Piece. Neither development of Pawns, nor Exchanges, (unless a Piece was moved more than once, in the process), will affect this specific Tempo tally ...

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 1.d4 d5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 1.d4 d5
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 1.d4 d5
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
No Pieces Developed
0
BLACK
No Pieces Developed
0

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 2.Nf3 c5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 2.Nf3 c5
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 2.Nf3 c5
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3
1
BLACK
No Pieces Developed
0

White is first to develop a Piece (2.Ng1-f3); Black chooses to develop another Pawn (2...c7-c5).

White is ahead in development (of Pieces) by one Tempo.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 3.c4 cxd4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 3.c4 cxd4
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 3.c4 cxd4
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3
1
BLACK
No Pieces Developed
0

Both sides make Pawn moves, so the Tempo tally remains unchanged.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 4.cxd5 Nf6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 4.cxd5 Nf6
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 4.cxd5 Nf6
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3
1
BLACK
4...Nf6
1

After White moves a Pawn, Black develops a Piece, to even-up the Tempo tally. Both sides are now level in Piece development.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 5.Nxd4 a6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 5.Nxd4 a6
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 5.Nxd4 a6
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4
1
BLACK
4...Nf6
1

White moves his King Knight for the second time; the first Tempo it gained is lost from the tally, which remains even, at one each.

The three Conditions (#1): H&M-S say Black's Pawn move (5...a7-a6) is the mistake that opens the window of opportunity for White to make his strategic development, which includes multiple moves of the same Pieces (Queen & King Knight).

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 6.e4 Nxe4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 6.e4 Nxe4
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 6.e4 Nxe4
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4
1
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4
1

Despite White moving a Pawn, Black fails to increase his Tempo tally, as he moves his King Knight, for a second time, in order to capture White's e4-Pawn.

The three Conditions (#2): H&M-S say that White deliberately allows his e-Pawn to be captured, as his d-Pawn serves a superior strategic purpose -- this Advanced Pawn has a Cramping effect on Black's Queenside, restricting Black's options for development ...

This restriction slows down Black's ability to develop his Pieces to key positions (c6 & e6 are both inaccessible for Black's Pieces), which is what gives White his "Strategic Advantage."

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 7.Qa4+ Bd7

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 7.Qa4+ Bd7
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 7.Qa4+ Bd7
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4;
7.Qa4+
2
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4; 7...Bd7
2

Both sides develop a new Piece. However, while their respective Tempo tallies increase, both remain level, on two Tempos each.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 8.Qb3 Nc5

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 8.Qb3 Nc5
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 8.Qb3 Nc5
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4;
7.Qa4+; 8.Qb3
2
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4; 7...Bd7; 8...Nc5
2

White moves his Queen, for a second time; Black moves his King Knight, for a third time.

The Tempo tally remains equal.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 9.Qe3 g6

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 9.Qe3 g6
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 9.Qe3 g6
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4;
7.Qa4+; 8.Qb3;
9.Qe3
2
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4; 7...Bd7; 8...Nc5
2

White moves his Queen, for a third time. However, the impact on the Tempo tally is diluted by Black developing a Pawn, not a Piece.

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 10.Nf3 Qc7

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 10.Nf3 Qc7
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 10.Nf3 Qc7
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4;
7.Qa4+; 8.Qb3;
9.Qe3; 10.Nf3
2
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4; 7...Bd7; 8...Nc5; 10...Qc7
3*

White moves his King Knight a third time. Black responds by developing his Queen, for the first time * ...

The three Conditions (#3): The "precise tactics" H&M-S focus on is White's careful maneuvering of his King Knight ...

Play the game through to 14...Bxd4 -- you'll see that White was all too aware of the threat from Black's dark-Bishop (...Bf8-g7 would attack d4, and White's Knight occupying that square), and so moves it back to f3, to enable his dark-Bishop to exchange Black's Bishop off the board (so it's no longer a threat to White's King Knight, or any Piece that needs to travel via the dark-squares).

My assumption was that White might want the Knight to remain in contention to (potentially) occupy either Sixth Rank Outpost (c6 or e6), if they become available, without Black either capturing White's Knight, or maneuvering into such a position that White wouldn't be able to effectively use his Knight, as intended. If that's the case, then White would have wasted time in making Multiple Moves of the Same Pieces (Queen & Knight, in this case).

* Okay, here goes ... Based on everything I've learnt so far, that "should" put Black one Tempo ahead in the Tempo tally, since I count 3x Black Pieces having been developed off their Back Rank, versus just two White Pieces.

BUT, in their book (p185), H&M-S state that "White is not behind in the tally of developed pieces -- two each."

The best I can come up with, for the discrepancy, is that Black's Bd7 was a "forced development", in order to defend its King. This means it wasn't necessarily developed to a "good" position, as part of Black's development plan. If that's the case, then Black will have to move his light-Bishop for a second time, which would cancel out the first developing move.

Unfortunately, H&M-S don't explain themselves, on this issue, so I'm left to speculation, (and that's why, until I learn otherwise, I've put the tally at 2:3, to Black).

Multiple Moves by the Same Piece, After: 11.Qc3 Rg8

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 130 - Multiple Moves by the Same Piece - After 11.Qc3 Rg8
Multiple Moves by the Same Piece
After: 11.Qc3 Rg8
PIECE MOVES TEMPO
WHITE
2.Nf3; 4.Nxd4;
7.Qa4+; 8.Qb3;
9.Qe3; 10.Nf3;
11.Qc3
2
BLACK
4...Nf6; 6...Nxe4; 7...Bd7; 8...Nc5; 10...Qc7
3

Black's Rook move is forced by the new position taken up by White's Queen.

While it's debatable whether Black is one Tempo ahead, or whether it's an even tally (2:2, as H&M-S state), the "qualitative" aspect reveals the Strategic Advantage gained by White's d5-Pawn, which still hits Black with a Cramped Position, deep inside Black's territory.

Black's Queen Knight is stuck, unable to move to c6, because of White's d5-Pawn.

If Black were to try and get his Queen Knight out, via d7, he would have to move his light-Bishop, for a second time (perhaps that's why H&M-S only scored Black two Tempos, in the tally of developed Pieces?), which would give White more time to continue developing strongly.

So, this is one instance where Multiple Moves of the Same Piece has turned out to be beneficial (for White), and not detrimental to his game -- which he went on to win, in any case.

Regarding Black's Queen Rook move, (above), which fails to affect the Tally of Developed Pieces:

H&M-S state that: "A better method of estimating the relative development is to count the number of pieces of each color off the back row, plus any developing moves on the first rank itself (castling; a rook move to a central file)." (PCC, p.181)

At first, I took this to mean that, if the Rook isn't developed to a file that that crosses the Expanded Center, then it isn't counted as having been developed, so it wouldn't affect the Tally of Developed Pieces (or, if you like, it would be a Tempo wasted, or lost).

However, it was during H&M-S's explanation of Exchanges (1 of 2), after Move 10, that I finally understood that a "developing move" includes any move that supports further development of Pawns and/or Pieces, so they can take up "good" positions ...

Click here, for an example of a Rook that has "actually been developed", and then at the position above, after 11...Rh8-g8, for the comparison ...

White's Queen (11.Qe3-c3) "forces Black's Rook to move", else it'll be captured by White's Queen. The distinction is that Black didn't voluntarily move his King Rook to a good position, as part of his plan of development. Therefore, despite it being a new Piece that's moved, it doesn't affect Black's Tempo tally, which stays at 3 Tempos.


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PGN

[Event "Bad Pistyan (07)"]
[Site "Bad Pistyan (07)"]
[Date "1922"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Alexander Alekhine"]
[Black "Heinrich Wolf"]
[ECO "D02"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "79"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 c5 3. c4 cxd4 4. cxd5 Nf6 5. Nxd4 a6 6. e4 Nxe4 7. Qa4+ Bd7 8. Qb3 Nc5 9. Qe3 g6 10. Nf3 Qc7 11. Qc3 Rg8 {PCC p.184 No. 130} 12. Be3 b6 13. Nbd2 Bg7 14. Bd4 Bxd4 15. Qxd4 Bb5 16. Bxb5+ axb5 17. O-O Ra4 18. b4 Qd8 19. a3 Nbd7 20. Rfe1 Kf8 21. d6 Ne6 22. Rxe6 fxe6 23. Ng5 Qb8 24. Nxe6+ Kf7 25. Ng5+ Kf8 26. Qd5 Rg7 27. Ne6+ Kg8 28. Nxg7+ Kxg7 29. dxe7 Nf6 30. Qxb5 Ra7 31. Re1 Qd6 32. e8=N+ Nxe8 33. Qxe8 Qxd2 34. Qe5+ Kf7 35. h4 Rxa3 36. Qe8+ Kg7 37. Re7+ Kh6 38. Qf8+ Kh5 39. Re5+ Kg4 40. Rg5+ 1-0

End.

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