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Strong Outpost Station
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2)

NO. 102A to NO. 102B ... p148-149, The Battle of Outposts,
Denker v. Kashdan, 1932

In the featured game, there were three Outpost stations that H&M-S focussed on, for their example:

  1. f5-Outpost (claimed by White);
  2. c6-Outpost (claimed by White);
  3. e4-Outpost (claimed by Black).
Beneath the ChessFlash viewer, you'll find my analysis of the two positions featured in Point Count Chess:
  1. PCC, p.148, No. 102A, after 14.Qe2
  2. PCC, p.149, No. 102B, after 21...e4
  3. Result of the Battle of Outposts.
  4. PGN

The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2)
My Analysis

Position #1, My Analysis
PCC, p.148, No. 102A, after 14.Qe2

After: 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 e6 3.c4 b6 4.g3 Bb7 5.Bg2 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Qe7 7.O-O Bxd2 8.Qxd2 O-O 9.Nc3 d6 10.Ne1 Bxg2 11.Nxg2 Nbd7 12.e4 Rfd8 13.f4 Nf8 14.Qe2

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A - Page 148
After: 14.Qe2

The following analysis looks at the first of three Outposts (f5, gained by White) ...

1. White's f5-Outpost

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 15...e5 - No Highlights
White's f5-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 14...e5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 15...e5
White's f5-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 14...e5

As seen in the images (above), White's f5-Outpost is created due to Black's e-Pawn advancing beyond the point where it could attack the f5-Outpost (14...e6-e5); while Black's g-Pawn (red square) doesn't want to advance to keep any White Piece from occupying the f5-Outpost, as that would create two Holes, at f6 & h6 respectively, which White might be able to exploit later on (and indeed does!).

In fact, H&M-S suggest that this very act (enticing Black's g-Pawn forward to g6, to create the Holes -- the territorial weakness in front of his Kingside Castled King) is one of the sought-after objectives from getting a Piece to occupy the f5-Outpost, in the first place. Once Black's g-Pawn has been enticed forward, the occupying Piece (e.g. the Knight at f5) can move away, as the threat from the Outpost has done its job.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21.exd5 - No Highlights
White's f5-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21.exd5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102A - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21.exd5
White's f5-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21.exd5

In the game, White's e4-Pawn partially secures the f5-Outpost, but it has gone -- captured across onto d5 (21.e4xd5) -- by the time White manages to get his Kingside Knight up to occupy the f5-Outpost (23.Ne3-f5), by which point White's focus has changed to the c6-Outpost, which White's former e-Pawn secures, from the d5-square.


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Position #2, My Analysis
PCC, p.149, No. 102B, after 21...e4

After: 14...e5 15.fxe5 dxe5 16.d5 Ng6 17.Ne3 Qc5 18.Kg2 Rac8 19.h4 c6 20.Rad1 cxd5 21.exd5 e4

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - Page 149
After: 21...e4

The following analysis looks at the last two Outposts (c6, gained by White; e4, gained by Black) ...

2. White's c6-Outpost

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 20...cxd5 - No Highlights
White's c6-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 20...cxd5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 20...cxd5
White's c6-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 20...cxd5

The capture of White's d5-Pawn, by Black's c-Pawn (20...c6xd5) is the catalyst for White switching focus from the f5-Outpost, to the c6-Outpost, as White's e-Pawn captures across onto d5 (21.e4xd5).

The viability of the c6-Outpost, and the possibility of getting a Piece to safely occupy it, was already present due to the absence of Black's b-Pawn (gone from b7) and Black's d-Pawn (gone from d7); both Black Pawns would otherwise have been able to thwart any attempt by White to occupy the c6-square with a Piece.

White eventually manages to get his Queenside Knight, from its first move position (c3, after 9.Nb1-c3), up onto the c6-Outpost, (after 24.Nc3-b525.Nb5-a726.Na7-b6).

Despite soon being captured by Black's Queenside Rook (27...Rc8xc6), White "Wins the Exchange" by capturing Black's Rook with the d5-Pawn, which had been securing the c6-Outpost. This is a decent trade (Knight for Rook), for White, not Black!, and worth the effort of getting the Pawn to d5, to guard the c6-Outpost.

3. Black's e4-Outpost

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21.exd5 - No Highlights
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21.exd5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21.exd5
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21.exd5

With White's f-Pawn having long since left the board, as soon as White's e4-Pawn captures across onto d5 (21.e4xd5), Black gains the e4-Outpost. The red & yellow arrows (in the image, above-right) show that both White's d- & f-Pawns are no longer present to defend the e4-square, which has become a Hole, and that benefits Black, who claims it as an Outpost.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21...e4 - No Highlights
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21...e4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 21...e4
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 21...e4

Usually, it's a Pawn that is used to secure an Outpost, so that a Piece can occupy it. However, in this case, Black chooses to occupy the e4-Outpost with his e-Pawn replacement (the former d-Pawn, which captured across onto the e-file after 15...d6xe5).

In this situation, it's kind of a role-reversal, with Black's Nf6 doing its best to defend the e4-Outpost, (plus the Pawn that occupies it).

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 29...Nfg4 - No Highlights
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 29...Nfg4
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 102B - The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 29...Nfg4
Black's e4-Outpost
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 29...Nfg4

By the time Black gives up on maintaining the e4-Outpost (29...Nf6-g4), White has already claimed Black's Queenside Rook (28...d5xc6) and "won the Exchange", his c6-Outpost having served its purpose.


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The Result of The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2)...

Of the two White Outposts, the f5-Outpost never really came to much. But it was the c6-Outpost that gave White his biggest return ...

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Result, The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 27.Qb2 - No Highlights
(RESULT) White's Wins
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 27.Qb2
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Result, The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 27.Qb2
(RESULT) White's Wins
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 27.Qb2

As seen in the image set (above), White's threat of Nf5xg6, followed by Qb2xf6, threatens to severely Compromise Black's King-side, by capturing the g7-Pawn and one of the Pieces (Nf6) defending Black's King.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Result, The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 28...Ne5 - No Highlights
(RESULT) White's Wins
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 27...Rxc6 28.dxc6 Ne5
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Result, The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 28...Ne5
(RESULT) White's Wins
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 27...Rxc6 28.dxc6 Ne5

As a result, Black is forced into a heavy loss (of material), just to prevent this from happening -- this is where Black sacrifices his Queenside Rook in exchange for White's Queenside Knight (27...Rc7xc6 28.d5xc6), thus "Winning the Exchange".

And then, with support from the Re8, Black's Ng6 nips across to block the attack on Nf6, by White's Queen. This takes the sting out of the combined threat from White's Qb2 & Nf5.

In the end, Black's e4-Outpost never really came to anything, and so it's White who won the Battle of the Outposts.

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 100 - Result, The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2), After 33.Nd5 - No Highlights
(RESULT) White's Wins
The Battle of Outposts (1 of 2),
After: 33.Nd5
Incidentally, although H&M-S don't mention it, White does get to occupy one last Outpost, after 33.Ne3-d5 (d5-Outpost, secured by White's c4-Pawn), as seen in the image (left).

I thought it worth a mention, as Black resigns two moves later, with the Knight still occupying the Outpost.

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PGN

[Event "United States of America"]
[Site "United States of America"]
[Date "1932.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Arnold Denker"]
[Black "Isaac Kashdan"]
[ECO "E16"]
[WhiteElo "2293"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "69"]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 e6 3.c4 b6 4.g3 Bb7 5.Bg2 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Qe7 7.O-O Bxd2 8.Qxd2 O-O 9.Nc3 d6 10.Ne1 Bxg2 11.Nxg2 Nbd7 12.e4 Rfd8 13.f4 Nf8 14.Qe2 {PCC p.148 No. 102A} e5 15.fxe5 dxe5 16.d5 Ng6 17.Ne3 Qc5 18.Kg2 Rac8 19.h4 c6 20.Rad1 cxd5 21.exd5 e4 {PCC p.149 No. 102B} 22.b3 Re8 23.Nf5 Re5 24.Nb5 a6 25.Na7 Rc7 26.Nc6 Re8 27.Qb2 Rxc6 28.dxc6 Ne5 29.Rd6 Nfg4 30.Rf4 Ne3+ 31.Nxe3 Qxd6 32.Rxe4 Qxc6 33.Nd5 Nd3 34.Qe2 Rxe4 35.Qxe4 1-0

End.

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