The Advanced Pawn:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 1) and the
Chess Strategies Guide (Section 2: Studying the Pawns)

The Advanced Pawn
Point Count Chess: [+]


Point Count Chess, Examples
The Advanced Pawn

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 26A to 26B - Page 46 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #1
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (1 of 2)

(p46) Diagram NO.26A to NO.26B
Taimanov v. Trifunovich, 1957
The Benoni Pawn at Q5
(1 of 2)


White's c-Pawn becomes the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), after Black tries to defend the d5-square with his King Knight to f6 (1...Ng8-f6).

The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) restricts the development of Black's Minor Pieces, which are denied access to two good development squares (c6 & e6).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 27A to 27B - Page 47-48 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #1
The Benoni Pawn at Q5 (2 of 2)

(p47-48) Diagram NO.27A to NO.27B
Teschner v. Fuderer, 1957
The Benoni Pawn at Q5
(2 of 2)


White's d-Pawn becomes the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5), in two short moves, after Black's opening c-Pawn move (1...c7-c5) tries to tempt White to divert his d-Pawn off the d-file. White ignores it, and puts his d-Pawn straight onto d5.

Once again, the Benoni Pawn at Q5 (d5) denies Black's Pieces access to two good development squares (c6 & e6). Multiple moves of the same Piece(s), may be needed to get his units into good positions, which wastes precious time.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28A - Page 48 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #2
Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)

(p48) Diagram NO.28A
Example Sequence
Black P-Q5 against the English (1 of 3)

Black's d-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4).

However, H&M-S call into question Black's decision, labeling it "dubious." White's natural lead in development (getting to move first), means, after Black's turn, each side should have developed an equal number of units. However, it's now White's turn to move, and White already has a one unit lead. Black has lost time by striving to create his early Advanced Pawn.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28B - Page 49 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #2
Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)

(p49) Diagram NO.28B
Example Sequence
Black P-Q5 against the English (2 of 3)

Black's d-Pawn remains the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4).

This example continues on from No.28A, revealing how Black loses two Tempi, in order to gain, then protect the Advanced Pawn, (hence H&M-S calling it "dubious").
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 28C - Page 50 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #2
Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)

(p50) Diagram NO.28C
Heinicke v. Stahlberg, 1955
Black P-Q5 against the English (3 of 3)

Black's d-Pawn remains the Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d4).

This example continues on from No.28A, where Black gained his "dubious" Advanced Pawn.

The main difference is a variation on No.28B, as Black attempts to preserve his dark-Bishop, by stopping White from sending his b-Pawn b4. However, White is content to trade his Queen Knight and take on a Weak Pawn structure (a-file), to take-out Black dark-Bishop.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 29 - Page 50 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #3
P-Q5 in the Ruy Lopez

(p50) Diagram NO.29
Yates v. Rubinstein, 1922
P-Q5 in the Ruy Lopez

White's d-Pawn becomes an Advanced Pawn at Q5 (d5), but misjudges the threat of a Bishop Pin against his Nf3, and ends up losing his Advanced Pawn (as wells as the e-Pawn that tried to replace it).

The take-home lesson is that, prior to pushing his d-Pawn into its Advanced position, White should take the time to ensure Black won't play the Bishop Pin, by guarding the g4 square with the h-Pawn (h2-h3).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 30 - Page 51 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #4
Securing an Outpost Station

(p51) Diagram NO.30
Gruenfeld v. Lokvenc, 1926
Securing an
Outpost Station


White's e-Pawn becomes an Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5), securing the d6-Outpost Station, while also contesting Control of the f6-square, which H&M-S say is "vital."

Prior to 1.e4-e5, note the position of Black's c- & e-Pawns: they have advanced out of range of the d6-square, turning it into a Hole, which in turn becomes White's Sixth Rank Outpost.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 31 - Page 52 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #5
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (1 of 2)

(p52) Diagram NO.31
Keres v. Szabo, 1955
P-K5 to Chase the
King Knight (1 of 2)


White's f-Pawn is taken across onto the e-file, to become the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5), and chase away Black's Nf6. This is typically done prior to launching his attack against the defences surrounding Black's Kingside-Castled King.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 32 - Page 53 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #5
P-K5 to Chase the King Knight (2 of 2)

(p53) Diagram NO.32
Zukertort v. Blackburne, 1883
P-K5 to Chase the
King Knight (2 of 2)


White's e-Pawn remains on the e-file and is pushed into the Advanced position, to chase away Black's Nf6, prior to White launching his attack against Black's Kingside, where his King has Castled.

However, in this example, I focus more on a Comparison between No.31 & No.32, to try and see why or when the f-Pawn might get the job instead of the e-Pawn (and vice versa).
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 33 - Page 55 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #6
P-K5 in the French Defense

(p55) Diagram NO.33
Kitto v. Wallace, 1955
P-K5 in the
French Defense


White's e-Pawn, once again, becomes the Advanced Pawn at K5.

However, this time, White's e5-Pawn becomes a "liability," rather than the asset, or advantage that it was in both No.31 & No.32.

This example includes a Comparison of No.31, No.32 & No.33, to try and determine what turns White's P-K5 into a liability, rather than an advantage.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 34 - Page 56 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #7
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)

(p56) Diagram NO.34
Euwe v. Bogoljubov, 1928
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (1 of 2)

White's d-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e5) by Capture, after White tempts Black into an exchange of Knights, on e5.

Includes an assessment of Black's Dilemma, which was caused by White's King Knight going to e5. Black was faced with the choice of leaving White's Ne5 occupying this Outpost; or he could capture it, and allow it to be replaced by White's d-Pawn (the Pawn at K5 by Capture). Black made the mistake of capturing; we see why.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 35 - Page 57 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #7
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (2 of 2)

(p57) Diagram NO.35
Tarrasch v. Von Scheve, 1894
The Pawn at K5 by Capture (2 of 2)

Black's d-Pawn becomes the Advanced Pawn at K5 (e4) by Capture, after Black tempts White into an exchange of Knights, on e4.

However, unlike No.34, where White's P-K5 (e5) by Capture was successful; here, Black's attempt puts him at a disadvantage.

Includes a Comparison of No.34 & No.35, revealing three factors that made White's attempt successful, while Black's attempt became a hindrance.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 36 - Page 58 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #8
The Pawn at KB5 by Capture (1 of 2)

(p58) Diagram NO.36
Dus Chotimirsky v. Capablanca, 1925
The Pawn at KB5 by Capture (1 of 2)

In this partly hypothetical example, Black's e-Pawn becomes the Pawn at KB5 (f4) by Capture.

Because the "by Capture" option typically requires the player's e-Pawn to capture away from the Center, thus weakening Center Control, H&M-S say the simple f-Pawn advance, to KB5, is often the stronger option.

This example shows the odd occasion when the Pawn at KB5 by Capture is a strong option.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 37 - Page 58 PCC, The Advanced Pawn. Example #8
The Pawn at KB5 by Capture (2 of 2)

(p58) Diagram NO.37
Alekhine v. Capablanca, 1914
The Pawn at KB5 by Capture (2 of 2)

White's e-Pawn becomes the Pawn at KB5 (f5) by Capture.

Includes a Comparison of No.36 & No.37, revealing why Black's Pawn at KB5 by Capture was an asset; while White's attempt proved to be a liability.

Further Reading

Point Count Chess (Horowitz & Mott-Smith, 1960)
  • The Advanced Pawn, (p44)
  • The Advanced Pawn SUMMARY, (p59)


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Studying the Pawns (Advanced Pawns)
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