The Advanced Chain:
Part of the Advanced Beginner's Chess Guide (Section 1) and the
Chess Strategies Guide (Section 2: Studying the Pawns)

The Advanced Chain
Point Count Chess: [+]


Point Count Chess, Examples
The Advanced Chain

Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram NO.15A to NO.15B - Page 29-30 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #1
The French Defense Chains

(p29-30) Diagram NO.15A to NO.15B
French Defense, Main Line
The French Defense Chains

The French Defence is defined by the moves
1.e2-e4 e7-e6.

After Black forms a Chain within his own territory, and following the development of a couple of Minor Pieces, White gains the Advanced Chain at his K5 (e5).

This is a short example that just shows how White's Advanced Chain is created. What to do with it is the subject of No.15C, below.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 15C - Page 32 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #2
Capitalizing an Advanced Chain

(p32) Diagram NO.15C
Example Sequence
Capitalizing an Advanced Chain

This example follows on directly from No.15B, showing how White can take advantage of his Advanced Chain, to attack Black's Kingside position, en route to winning the game.

Note the position of White's Rf2, which plays an integral role in securing victory, by Checkmate. White's King Knight and Queen are also key, as they're sacrificed to enable White's successful Mating attack.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 16 - Page 33 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #3
The Insecure Chain (1 of 2)

(p33) Diagram NO.16
Kopilov v. Taimanov, 1949
The Insecure Chain
(1 of 2)


White gains the Advanced Chain at his QB5 (c5), from the English Opening (1.c2-c4).

The loss of both the e- & f-Pawns, in quick succession, plus the vulnerability of the d4-Pawn (exposed as being Backward), reveals the insecure nature of White's Advanced Chain.

In the process of creating his Advanced Chain, White turns his dark-Bishop into a Bad Bishop, which is a virtual bystander, as Black tears apart White's Chain.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 17 - Page 34 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #3
The Insecure Chain (2 of 2)

(p34) Diagram NO.17
Shiva v. Szabo, 1955
The Insecure Chain
(2 of 2)


White first gains an Advanced Salient at QB5 (c5), which is then reduced to an Advanced Chain, before its vulnerability is also exposed, and it's subsequently demolished.

White's Queen plays a significant role in his Advanced Chain being compromised.

Includes a Comparison of No.15C, No.16 & No.17, highlighting three possible factors that may determine whether an Advanced Chain will be successful, or not.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 18 - Page 35 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #4
The Chain in the King's Gambit Declined (1 of 2)

(p35) Diagram NO.18
Capablanca v. Allies, 1914
The Chain in the King's Gambit Declined (1 of 2)

White gains the Advanced Chain at his KB5 (f5), instead of choosing to use his f-Pawn to capture Black e6-Pawn (both good options for White, so say H&M-S).

White's f-Pawn Cramps Black's light-Bishop and prevents reinforcements coming over to stop White's intended Pawn Storm, against Black's Kingside position.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 19 - Page 36 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #4
The Chain in the King's Gambit Declined (2 of 2)

(p36) Diagram NO.19
Alapin v. Rubinstein, 1908
The Chain in the King's Gambit Declined (2 of 2)

White gains the Advanced Chain at his KB5 (f5), but this time it is unsuccessful, as Black is able to cause its destruction, without White gaining any lasting benefit.

Includes a Comparison between No.18 & No.19, which, among other factors, seems to suggest White should avoid the Advanced Chain (by not playing f4-f5), if Black's light-Bishop is no longer on the board, since White cannot benefit from its Cramping, by his Pawn at f5.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 20 - Page 38 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #5
The Chain on Q5 (1 of 2)

(p38) Diagram NO.20
Rubinstein v. Salwe, 1907
The Chain on Q5 (1 of 2)

White gains the Advanced Chain at his Q5 (d5), which once more comes from a King's Gambit Declined opening.

White is successful with this Advanced Chain, as he eventually dissolves it, to form a new Advanced Chain at his K5 (e5), transferring one advantage into another, as he continues to push his Pawns forward, as part of a successful attack against Black's position.
Point Count Chess - IE - Diagram 21 - Page 38 PCC, The Advanced Chain. Example #5
The Chain on Q5 (2 of 2)

(p38) Diagram NO.21
Tarrasch v. Teichmann, 1905
The Chain on Q5 (2 of 2)

White gains the Advanced Chain on Q5 (d5), from a variation of the Ruy Lopez, Morphy Defence.

H&M-S warn that this way of gaining the Advanced Chain requires "rather precise calculation," because of the threat by Black, down the Kingside.

Despite the risk, White is successful with this particular Advanced Chain, and even takes on a Doubled Pawn structure, which isn't weak, as he goes on to win the game.

Further Reading

Point Count Chess (Horowitz & Mott-Smith, 1960)
  • Advanced Chains and Salients, (p29)
  • The French Defense Chains, (p29)
  • Attacking an Advanced Chain, (p30)
  • Capitalizing an Advanced Chain, (p31)
  • The Insecure Chain, (p33)
  • The Chain in the King's Gambit Declined, (p35)
  • The Chain on Q5, (p37)
  • Advanced Chains and Salients SUMMARY, (p43)


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Studying the Pawns (Advanced Pawns)
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